Saturday, August 15, 2020

Tag: Spinal Cord Injury Research

How paralyzed people are learning to walk | Susan Harkema | TEDxManhattanBeach

Published: March 12, 2019

Until now, it was believed that paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury was irreversible. In her provocative talk, Susan Harkema shares breakthrough research showing amazing functionality of the spinal cord, giving people with paralysis new reason for hope.

Life-changing injury leads to research career for Peter Grahn, Ph.D.

Published: February 6, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

WILLMAR — A diving accident the summer after he graduated from Willmar High School changed the whole course of Peter Grahn’s life.

The spinal cord injury he suffered was life-altering but it’s also what led him to his calling — as a researcher into the intricacies of neuromodulation at the Mayo Clinic.

The work he’s doing at Mayo could someday enable people like him to recover, even if only partially, from spinal cord injuries that limit their ability to walk, use their hands and move around freely.

Can nanotechnology rewire an injured spinal cord?

Published: January 21, 2019

According to the World Health Organisation, up to a half-million people around the world suffer a spinal cord injury each year. Often caused by road traffic crashes, accidents or violence, the loss of motor control or paralysis significantly impacts quality of life and requires years of treatment and care. Spinal cord injury is also associated with lower rates of school enrollment and economic participation, and carries substantial individual and societal costs.

Current methods for spinal cord injury treatment involve cumbersome brain-machine interfaces, with many cables linking the patient and a computer to restore limited motor functions.

FSU research sheds light on spinal cord injuries

Published: January 21, 2019

Thousands of people worldwide suffer severe spinal cord injuries each year, but little is known about why these injuries often continue to deteriorate long after the initial damage occurs.

Yi Ren, a professor of biomedical sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine, is making progress in understanding why such significant harm is inflicted in the weeks and months after a spinal injury. In a study published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience, Ren explained how a natural immune system response may contribute to additional injury.

Meet the woman behind charity fighting to find a cure for spinal cord injuries

Published: January 7, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

The Herald speaks with Kiwis who have been on the edge of death, had their world tipped upside down, overcome their darkest moments and are now paying it forward.

Cycling to the base of Mt Everest, completing the New York Marathon and raising more than $10 million for Spinal Cord Injury research – all in a wheel chair – is only the start of Catriona Williams’ story.

New approach could jumpstart breathing after spinal cord injury

Published: October 11, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A research team at the Krembil Research Institute in Toronto has developed an innovative strategy that could help to restore breathing following traumatic spinal cord injury.

The team, led by principal investigator Dr. Michael Fehlings – a neurosurgeon/neuroscientist, specialist in spinal cord injury and senior scientist at UHN – published its findings today in the journal Nature in a paper titled “Cervical excitatory neurons sustain breathing after spinal cord injury.”

Department of Defense Awards $2.5M for Improving Spinal Cord Injury in Rehabilitation

Published: May 7, 2018

In the United States, more than 280,000 people—including 42,000 military veterans—are affected by spinal cord injury (SCI), including limb weakness and paralysis. While rehabilitation can be helpful, the benefits are slow and inadequate to restore patients’ lost independence. A team of researchers at Cleveland Clinic is trying to speed recovery using noninvasive brain stimulation.

Ela B. Plow, PhD, PT, of Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute, recently received a four-year, $2.5 M award from the Department of Defense (DoD) to lead a brain stimulation study in patients with paralyzed upper limbs due to SCI. The award was granted under the DoD’s Spinal Cord Injury Research Program.

Gene jumpstarts regeneration of damaged nerve cells

Published: April 10, 2018

Searching the entire genome, a Yale research team has identified a gene that when eliminated can spur regeneration of axons in nerve cells severed by spinal cord injury.

“For the first time, the limits on nerve fiber regeneration were studied in an unbiased way across nearly all genes,” said Stephen Strittmatter, the Vincent Coates Professor of Neurology and senior author of the study appearing April 10 in the journal Cell Reports. “We had no idea whether we knew a lot or a little about the mechanics of nerve cell regeneration.”

Spinal Cord Injury Research Evidence (SCIRE) Community

Published: March 20, 2018
scireproject.org

Spinal Cord Injury Research Evidence (SCIRE) Community provides free information about spinal cord injury research that is written in everyday language.

SCIRE Community is a new addition to the SCIRE Project. The SCIRE Project is an international collaboration of scientists and health professionals that provides systematic reviews of spinal cord injury research for health professionals and researchers. The aim of the SCIRE Project has been to enable SCI professionals to guide their practice based on current best evidence.

Promising therapeutic approach for spinal cord injuries

Published: March 1, 2018

The healing ability of the central nervous system is very limited and injuries to the brain or spinal cord often result in permanent functional deficits. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet report in the scientific journal Cell that they have found an important mechanism that explains why this happens. Using this new knowledge, they were able to improve functional recovery following spinal cord injury in mice.

In many organs, damaged tissue can be repaired by generating new cells of the type that were lost.