Thursday, December 5, 2019

Tag: Spinal Cord Stimulator

Electrical stimulation technique helps patients with spinal cord injury

Published: February 19, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

For many individuals with spinal cord injury, restoring autonomic functions – such as blood pressure control, bowel, bladder and sexual function – is of a higher priority than walking again.

Paralysis (loss of muscle function) is the most visible consequence of a spinal cord injury. Historically, there have been few significant advances in the treatment of such paralysis in individuals with long-term injuries.

Individual with complete spinal cord injury regains voluntary motor function

Published: October 26, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

A research participant at the University of Louisville with a complete spinal cord injury, who had lost motor function below the level of the injury, has regained the ability to move his legs voluntarily and stand six years after his injury.

A study published today in Scientific Reports describes the recovery of motor function in a research participant who previously had received long-term activity-based training along with spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES). In the article, senior author Susan Harkema, Ph.D., professor and associate director of the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC) at the University of Louisville, and her colleagues report that over the course of 34.5 months following the original training, the participant recovered substantial voluntary lower-limb motor control and the ability to stand independently without the use of scES.

Spinal Cord Injury Research: Mayo Clinic Radio

Published: May 6, 2017

Dr. Kristin Zhao, director of Mayo Clinic’s Assistive and Restorative Technology Laboratory, and Dr. Kendall Lee, director of Mayo Clinic’s Neural Engineering Laboratory, will discuss research that has successfully used intense physical therapy and electrical stimulation of the spinal cord to return voluntary movements to a previously paralyzed patient.

Experimental implant shows promise for restoring voluntary movement after spinal cord injury

Published: December 13, 2016

UCLA scientists test electrical stimulation that bypasses injury; technique boosts patient’s finger control, grip strength up to 300 percent

A spinal stimulator being tested by doctors at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is showing promise in restoring hand strength and movement to a California man who broke his neck in a dirt bike accident five years ago.

In June, Brian Gomez, now 28, became one of the first people in the world to undergo surgery for the experimental device.

Vanderbilt study explores spinal cord stimulation to treat paralysis

Published: December 3, 2015

Vanderbilt University Medical CenterA Vanderbilt neurosurgeon is looking to recruit patients with paraplegia to investigate whether intraspinal microstimulation technology can restore complex body movements.

The implantation of tiny electrodes along the spinal cord has caused paralyzed animals to walk, but it has yet to be tested with humans. Peter Konrad, M.D., Ph.D., and his research team are seeking volunteers willing to participate in a proof of concept experiment.

The study requirements are very specific.

Five Years After Being Paralyzed from the Chest Down, Dustin Shillcox Completes the New...

Published: November 1, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Dustin ShillcoxAfter crossing the finish line in the New York City Marathon Sunday, hand cyclist Dustin Shillcox had a message for the millions of people living with paralysis. “I’m living proof nothing is impossible.”

The 31-year-old from Green River, Wyoming, is paralyzed from the chest down, but that didn’t stop him from racing in the marathon and crossing the finish line in one hour, 46 minutes and 49 seconds.

“It’s hard to put into words how I felt crossing the finish line,” Shillcox said. “I thought about Christopher Reeve, and the millions living with paralysis who are told there is no hope for recovery.”

Study Examines Difference Between High- and Low-frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation

Published: July 30, 2015

SpineSpinal cord stimulation is nothing new, but a new study suggests that maybe we have been approaching it the wrong way; or rather, that maybe we have more to learn about it.

But, in case you don’t know, spinal cord stimulation is a type of pain management which involves placing an implant under the skin which delivers electric pulses to the torso or the limbs to relieve chronic pain. Typically, spinal cord stimulation involves delivering low-frequency waves (40 to 60 Hz) but a new study says that, perhaps, high-frequency (up to 10,000 Hz) might be better in some cases.

How paralyzed patients are able to stand again

Published: July 24, 2015

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzOBwR70_Z4

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — In what’s being hailed as a breakthrough in spinal cord injury research, four men paralyzed from the chest down have risen from their wheelchairs on their own volition and effort.

Learning to Walk again

Published: February 14, 2015

paralyzed-ratsScientists at EPFL in Switzerland have designed a spinal implant which can join severed ends of the spinal cord together allowing paralysed rats to walk again once more. The implant has been named “e-Dura”, short for “Electronic Dura Mater” because the device electronically mimics the function of the dura mater, a protective layer of tissue surrounding the spinal cord. Its function is to prevent foreign substances from entering and damaging the spinal cord.

The spinal cord itself bridges the gap between the brain (where most of the decision making process takes place) and the rest of the body.

TED Video: Paralyzed Lab Rat Walks Again after New Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

Published: January 8, 2015

Paralyzed Lab Rat Walks AgainIt only takes a moment for an accident to sever or damage an individual’s spinal cord enough to result in paralysis. In this amazing TED Talks video, on research scientist explains how his team has developed a treatment which has allowed a paralyzed lab rat to walk, and they hope could lead to an ultimate cure for spinal cord injurys.

When the spinal cord is injured, it can sever the communication between your brain and your body, which produces the paralysis.

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