Thursday, January 23, 2020

Tag: spinal implant

Micro implants could restore standing and walking

Published: December 2, 2019

U of A research has a proven concept to restore spinal function.

U of A research has a proven concept to restore spinal function.
When Vivian Mushahwar first applied to grad school, she wrote about her idea to fix paralysis by rewiring the spinal cord.

Cleveland researchers develop technology to give spinal cord injury patients use of hands back

Published: October 4, 2019

CLEVELAND — Ground-breaking, life-changing research is happening at MetroHealth Medical Center when it comes to spinal cord injuries and giving people function back.

Spinal cord stimulation, physical therapy help paralyzed man stand, walk with assistance

Published: September 24, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Spinal cord stimulation and physical therapy have helped a man paralyzed since 2013 regain his ability to stand and walk with assistance. The results, achieved in a research collaboration between Mayo Clinic and UCLA, are reported in Nature Medicine.

With an implanted stimulator turned on, the man, Jered Chinnock, was able to step with a front-wheeled walker while trainers provided occasional assistance.

One Small Step for a Paraplegic, One Big Step Toward Reversing Paralysis

Published: March 14, 2017

In a hospital in Switzerland, permanently paralyzed people are now learning to walk again with the help of stimulating electrodes implanted in their spines. For Grégoire Courtine, professor of neuroprosthetics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), this day has been a long time coming. “It took us 15 years to get from paralyzed rats to the first steps in humans,” he says. “Maybe in 10 more years, our technology will be ready for the clinic.”

Courtine has made it his mission to reverse paralysis. He started 15 years ago with those paralyzed rats, putting tiny electrical implants into their spines to stimulate nerve fibers below the site of their spinal cord injuries.

If other paralyzed primates walk, will humans?

Published: December 23, 2016

paralyzed primates walkIn the annals of breathtaking scientific advances, it’s hard to top this recent news headline: “Paralyzed Monkeys Can Walk Again With Wireless Brain-Spine Connection.”

This is legit? Yes. How so? Scientists implant a chip in a monkey’s brain that sends wireless signals through a computer to electrodes in the lower back. The system stimulates a neural pathway that controls the muscles involved in walking.

Voila, the paralyzed primate walks.

Spinal cord rehabilitation and repair: an interview with Quentin Barraud

Published: November 15, 2016

dr-quentin-barraudSpinal cord repair and rehabilitation is a difficult but important topic to research, can you please give a brief overview of research in this field?

There are many grades of spinal cord injuries, in terms of range of movement, from small disabilities to becoming wheelchair bound for the rest of your life, the range is very broad.

There are many different approaches to try to overcome these disabilities, with key areas of research being focussed on developing stem cell therapies and using growth factors to promote regrowth of the nerve tissue after the injury.

Stretchy spinal implant presents new paralysis treatment

Published: June 12, 2015

stretchy spinal implantA thin and flexible implant that can be applied directly to the surface of the spinal cord to administer electrical and chemical stimulation has been developed by scientists in Switzerland. The e-Dura implant, made from a silicon substrate embedded with electrodes, replicates the properties of the soft living tissue around the spinal cord; meaning it can remain in situ without discomfort.

In 2012 the researchers showed how electrical-chemical stimulation could restore lower body movement in rats with spinal cord injuries.

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