Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: tendon transfer

Paralyzed Patients Regain the Use of Their Hands Thanks to Breakthrough Nerve Surgery in...

Published: August 14, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Recent surgical trials have bestowed new life on quadriplegics who can now return to activities they never thought they’d be able to do again, thanks to an innovative surgery that relocates nerves.

A dirt bike accident in 2015 left Australian Paul Robinson, now in his 30s, paralyzed from the chest down. Robinson landed on his head and broke one of the vertebrae in his neck, leaving him confined to a wheelchair and rarely able to leave his home. He was one of 16 people participating in a medical trial at Austin Health in Melbourne that used nerve transfers to re-enervate paralyzed muscles in quadriplegic patients.

Rewiring of nerves gives movement to paralyzed arms and hands

Published: July 5, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Researchers from Australia have successfully “rewired” the nerves within the paralyzed arms of some accident survivors and provided them with successful movement of arms and hands.

The results of the study titled, “Expanding traditional tendon-based techniques with nerve transfers for the restoration of upper limb function in tetraplegia: a prospective case series”, were published in the latest issue of the Lancet.

Using tendon transfer surgery to restore key functions in spinal cord injury patient

Published: July 20, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

After suffering a severe cervical spinal cord injury from a bad fall at work, Scott McConnell had little function remaining in his hands and arms.

Tendon Transfer: Restoring Hand & Arm Function to Spinal Cord Patients

Published: May 31, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

After suffering a severe spinal cord injury from a bad fall at work, Scott McConnell had little function remaining in his hands and arms.

Quadriplegic retrofits truck to accommodate special needs

Published: December 28, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Ryan Baetke's modified accessible truckLingering cleanup chores, tasks he didn’t attend to during the holiday weekend, consume Ryan Baetke’s Monday night at his home just north of Davenport.

From the seat of his motorized wheelchair, the 48-year-old sweeps the floor of his garage as his “sidekick,” a golden retriever named Annie, gnaws on a bone. As he scoops the dust into a garbage can, Baetke motions to another sidekick nearby.

At first glance, the 2015 GMC Sierra parked in the adjacent bay doesn’t appear to be anything special.

Tendon Transfer Should Be Used More Often in Tetraplegia

Published: September 7, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

tendon-tranferTendon transfer can significantly improve hand and elbow function in quadriplegic patients, but the procedure is greatly underused, according to a new study.

A review of studies by hand surgeon Professor Michael Bednar, MD, of Loyola Medicine (Maywood, IL, USA) found that an estimated 65-75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery, but only 14% of patients actually complete the procedure. Tendon transfer surgically redirects functional muscles to do the work of muscles that are paralyzed. Depending on the extent of the spinal cord injury, tendon transfers can enable a patient to grasp objects, pinch, open the hand, and straighten the elbow.

Surgery that restores hand and elbow function in quadriplegics is underused

Published: August 23, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

loyola-university-health-system-squarelogoMAYWOOD, IL – A surgery for quadriplegics called tendon transfer can significantly improve hand and elbow function, but the procedure is greatly underused, according to an article in the journal Hand Clinics by Loyola Medicine hand surgeon Michael S. Bednar, MD, FAAOS.

In the procedure, muscles that still work are redirected to do the jobs of muscles that are paralyzed. Depending on the extent of the spinal cord injury, tendon transfers can enable a patient to grasp objects, pinch, open the hand and straighten the elbow. The patient can, for example, propel a wheelchair in the snow, use a fork without splints, grip a fishing pole, shake hands and perform daily activities such as dressing, bathing, toileting and transferring to and from a wheelchair.

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