Saturday, August 17, 2019

Tag: The Miami Project

On and off the field, Nick Buoniconti made a difference

Published: August 2, 2019

Yes, Nick Buoniconti was a famous football player. He was a member of the Miami Dolphins’ “Perfect Season” and Super Bowl championship teams. He was known for playing middle linebacker with a passion, tracking down quarterbacks like a heat-seeking missile.

He was an integral part of the Dolphins’ glory years.

But as Buoniconti’s legacy is reassessed following his death on Tuesday, it’s pretty much unanimous that it’s what he did after he left the field — and a horrific family tragedy — that truly meant the most to so many South Floridians.

Transforming Thoughts to Movement Offers New Hope for Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: March 28, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

What if paralyzed limbs could move using only the power of one’s thoughts? Borrowing a story line from the realm of science fiction, a team of researchers at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis—together with neurosurgeons and biomedical engineers from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine—are using a brain-machine interface to make this once seemingly impossible feat a reality for victims of spinal cord injury (SCI). Seeking innovative ways to restore function after SCI is one of the central goals for The Miami Project, which was founded in 1985 and has grown to become one of the “crown jewels” of the Miller School of Medicine—and a model for other institutions developing centers for SCI research.

Dr. Monica Perez’s Team Shows First Evidence of Using Cortical Targets to Improve Motor...

Published: June 13, 2017

Monica A. Perez, P.T., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery and The Miami Project, and colleagues, recently published A novel cortical target to enhance hand motor output in humans with spinal cord injury in the June issue of Brain that provides the first evidence that cortical targets could represent a novel therapeutic site for improving motor function in humans paralyzed by spinal cord injury (SCI).

A main goal of rehabilitation strategies in humans with SCI is to strengthen transmission in spared neural networks. Although neuromodulatory strategies have targeted different sites within the central nervous system to restore motor function following SCI, the role of cortical targets remains poorly understood.

Transplantation Safety Trial Using Schwann Cells Completed Successfully

Published: March 3, 2017

The Miami Project, at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, today announced the publication of its first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Phase I clinical trial involving Schwann cells used to repair the damaged spinal cord, in the February issue of the Journal of Neurotrauma.  Schwann cells are essential for the repair of nerve damage, and long thought to be able to increase recovery after spinal cord injury. The trial, performed at University of Miami / Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, is the first in a series designed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of transplanting autologous human Schwann cells to treat individuals with spinal cord injuries.

Darrell Gwynn ‘comes Home’ As He Joins The Buoniconti Fund To Cure Paralysis

Published: February 21, 2015

Marc Buoniconti Richard Petty Darrell GwynnThe Hall of Fame Drag Racer will unite with Marc Buoniconti to help find a cure for paralysis and help those living with paralysis have an improved quality of life

Nearing the 25th anniversary of both his last National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) win and the accident that left him paralyzed, Hall of Fame Drag Racer Darrell Gwynn announced today that he will begin a new chapter in his journey to support those living with paralysis. Gwynn will officially become the Director of The Darrell Gwynn Quality of Life Chapter of The Buoniconti Fund to Cure Paralysis.

National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month 2014

Published: September 2, 2014

September is National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness MonthU.S. Senate Resolution 533 designates September 2014 as National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month.

“…every 48 minutes a person will become paralyzed, underscoring the urgent need to develop new neuroprotection, pharmacological, and regeneration treatments to reduce, prevent, and reverse paralysis…”

U.S. Senate Recognizes September As “National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month” – Designation Builds Support for The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis…

Study finds axon regeneration after Schwann cell graft to injured spinal cord

Published: December 23, 2013

Putnam Valley, NY. (Dec. 23 2013) – A study carried out at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine for “The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis” has found that transplanting self-donated Schwann cells (SCs, the principal ensheathing cells of the nervous system) that are elongated so as to bridge scar tissue in the injured spinal cord, aids hind limb functional recovery in rats modeled with spinal cord injury. The study will be published in a future issue of Cell Transplantation.

Doctors seek new subjects after first successful cell transplant

Published: March 14, 2013

miami-project-cure-for-paralysis-logoAfter decades of research, The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis has completed its first human cell transplant for a spinal cord injury.

Doctors grew what are called Schwann cells from nerve tissue taken from an unidentified man’s leg, then transplanted them back into his own body. The patient now has passed the critical 30-day, post-operation period without complications, giving researchers hope that they’re headed toward curing paralysis and developing treatments for neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

Miami Project To Cure Paralysis Doctors Perform First Schwann Cell Transplant For Spinal Cord...

Published: January 23, 2013

miami-project-cure-for-paralysis-logoJanuary 23, 2013 – Doctors at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, performed the first-ever Food and Drug Administration approved Schwann cell transplantation in a patient with a new spinal cord injury. The procedure, performed at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center, is a Phase 1 clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of transplanting the patient’s own Schwann cells.

“This historic clinical trial represents a giant step forward in a field of medicine where each tangible step has tremendous value. This trial, and these first patients in this trial specifically, are extremely important to our mission of curing paralysis,” said neurosurgeon Barth Green, M.D., Co-Founder and Chairman of The Miami Project, and Professor and Chair of Neurological Surgery.

FDA approval to move forward with Phase I safety trial using Schwann cells in...

Published: August 1, 2012 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , , , , , ,

The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has received permission from the Food and Drug Administration to begin a Phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety of transplanting human Schwann cells to treat patients with recent spinal cord injuries.

We are not recruiting anybody until we obtain approval from our Institutional Review Board.

This trial is just 1 brick in the wall. We will continue working with our scientific colleagues to test other “bricks” in the wall to ultimately develop a strong defense to prevent or reverse the many effects of paralysis.

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