Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Tag: University of Wisconsin

Quadriplegic Man’s passion for paddling helps other disabled people adjust

Published: March 5, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

We take so much for granted, but there are those around us who make us feel comfortable with the world no matter what it may throw at you.

I believe that thought popped into my head the very first time I met Andy Janicky, and it certainly was confirmed after a long conversation with him recently about his nonprofit, Wheels to Water.

‘What I can do, not can’t do’

Published: October 4, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Four years after life-changing accident, he’s back in the race

Jake Anderson is a competitor. A captain of the Chanhassen boys hockey team in 2011-12, he scored 10 goals, helping the Storm to its best finish in program history with 20 wins.

Sitting on the sidelines, or bench in hockey terms, has never been Anderson’s thing.

He wants to be a part of the action.

Engineer aims to grow spinal tissue in lab

Published: March 21, 2017

For a soldier who suffered a spinal cord injury on the battlefield, the promise of regenerative medicine is to fully repair the resulting limb paralysis. But that hope is still years from reality.

Not only powerful, but efficient. Studying diseases in lab-created tissue may help reduce the price tag — now roughly $1.8 billion — for bringing a new drug to market, which is one of the reasons Ashton received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for advancing tissue engineering of the human spinal cord. During the project’s five-year funding period, his lab in the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery will fine-tune the technology for growing a neural tube, the developmental predecessor of the spinal cord, from scratch.

Laying a foundation for treating ALS, spinal cord injury

Published: February 2, 2015

Zhang_stem_cell_lab13_2360This story starts in 1955, upon the death of Albert Einstein, when the pathologist charged with performing the famous scientist’s autopsy stole his brain.

Fast forward to the 1980s when a University of California, Berkeley scientist was studying parts of the stolen goods involved in complex thinking and discovered that the father of relativity had more of certain types of cells, called astrocytes, than other human brains studied.

Today, another 30 years later, scientists still don’t have a solid grasp on everything these cells do in the human nervous system, largely because they’re difficult to study.