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Monthly Archives: August 2006

Rocket Technology used to Develop a Physical Therapy Device

Published: August 31, 2006

154772main_sam_walker-250pxNASA Technology Helping Injured U.S. Troops

Patented NASA technology that originally enhanced robotics and sounding rockets is now aiding U.S. soldiers returning from overseas duty with spinal cord or traumatic brain injuries, at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., The revolutionary new Physical Therapy device named SAM, for the Secure Ambulation Mode, is based on technology originally developed and honed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Image right:NASA-developed technology was the basis for SAM, a wheeled walker that supports a patient ’s upper body weight and pelvis, and mimics hip joint movement. Credit: NASA

New Research On Spinal Cord Injury Funded By Speeding Fines

Published: August 28, 2006

More than a dozen Rochester scientists seeking ways to reverse or lessen the effects of paralysis and other effects of spinal cord injury will begin new projects and continue promising research, thanks to motorists in New York State who push the gas pedal a little too far.

Three research projects at the University of Rochester Medical Center are among the programs funded this year through the Spinal Cord Injury Research Program run by the New York State Department of Health. The program, created in 1998, uses fines paid by speeding motorists to fund research into spinal cord injury, whose number-one cause nationwide is Motor vehicle accidents.

Boca quadriplegic fights to walk again

Published: August 27, 2006

Kevin Mullin’s life changed forever October 6, 2003.

At 24, Mullin of Boca Raton was an athletic swimmer and scuba diver who landed a job at a pharmaceutical staffing company two months prior to that fateful day.

But everything changed when a trip to a Boca beach with his sister and niece ended in a near death experience and a diagnosis of Quadriplegia.

‘Ethical’ stem cell lines created

Published: August 23, 2006

Human embryonic stem cell lines have been generated without embryos being destroyed, according to researchers.

A US team created the lines by removing single cells from embryos, a process that left them intact, they report in the journal Nature.

At present, growing this type of stem cell results in embryo destruction.

CU enters stem cell big league

Published: August 23, 2006

8242006bAURORA – The University of Colorado has scored a $6 million gift from Denver’s Gates family and gained a top Texas researcher, two major steps toward transforming CU into one of the country’s premier stem cell research centers, medical school officials said Wednesday.

CU officials announced the Gates donation – the largest research gift in the School of Medicine’s history – Wednesday afternoon at the university’s Fitzsimons campus.

NASA Technology Helping Injured U.S. Troops

Published: August 22, 2006

Patented NASA technology that originally enhanced robotics and sounding rockets is now aiding U.S. soldiers returning from overseas duty with spinal cord or traumatic brain injuries, at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., The revolutionary new Physical Therapy device named SAM, for the Secure Ambulation Mode, is based on technology originally developed and honed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

NASA-developed technology was the basis for SAM, a wheeled walker that supports a patient ’s upper body weight and pelvis, and mimics hip joint movement. Credit: NASA

Two decades later, Hansen is still a man in motion

Published: August 22, 2006

VANCOUVER — With muscular shoulders dominating his powerful athletic frame and not a trace of age on his still-boyish face, Rick Hansen looks young and fit enough to head out on another marathon wheelchair odyssey right now.

Perish the thought. Mr. Hansen is a mere 12 months away from turning 50; it’s 20 years, tomorrow, since he began a memorable wheel across Canada to cap an unprecedented 40,000-kilometre tour around the world, and more than 30 years since the tragic accident that cost him the use of his legs.

Even the perpetual man in motion is getting older.

Right under our noses

Published: August 22, 2006

I AM writing from the perspective of a neurobiologist, who has been working in the area of neural Regeneration for over 20 years.

This has led to a concerted research program in the past five years investigating an adult stem cell. I am writing, therefore, in the context of technological developments in adult stem cell biology.

These developments, I believe, alter the context of the current debate by providing serious alternatives to embryonic stem cells for cell transplantation, for investigation of disease, and drug discovery.

Regeneration study could offer hope to humans

Published: August 21, 2006

The genes and proteins in salamanders and frog tadpoles hold secrets that IUPUI researchers hope will lead them to discover how to regenerate limbs and tissues in humans.

Scientists with the Indiana University Center for Regenerative Biology and Medicine will use a three-year, $1.6 million gift from the W.M. Keck Foundation of Los Angeles to study amphibians’ regenerative powers.
“We are trying to find out how this is done in animals that already know how to do it,” said David L. Stocum, center director and biology professor at IU-Purdue Indianapolis.

Learning a new routine

Published: August 20, 2006

142952-1Injured Tucson gymnast endures Rehabilitation in Colorado, where he begins to heal and adapts to life as a quadriplegic

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Drew Donnellan reaches his lips to the plastic straw sticking out of his motorized wheelchair.

He puffs hard once, and his chair edges forward. A soft puff turns right, a soft sip left. A hard sip jolts him backward.

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