Thursday, August 6, 2020

Tag: Andrei Krassioukov

Electrical stimulation technique helps patients with spinal cord injury

Published: February 19, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

For many individuals with spinal cord injury, restoring autonomic functions – such as blood pressure control, bowel, bladder and sexual function – is of a higher priority than walking again.

Paralysis (loss of muscle function) is the most visible consequence of a spinal cord injury. Historically, there have been few significant advances in the treatment of such paralysis in individuals with long-term injuries.

Electrical implant could improve daily activities for people with spinal cord injuries: study

Published: February 19, 2018

An experimental treatment that sends electrical currents through the spinal cord has improved “invisible” yet debilitating side effects for a B.C. man with a spinal cord injury.

Doctor re-examines evidence on UTIs in patients with spinal cord injury

Published: December 13, 2017

People with spinal cord injuries rely on catheters to empty their bladder. When a well-respected publication concluded that catheters could be reused without an increased risk of infection, it didn’t sit right with a Vancouver clinician and researcher. He had spoken to wheelchair athletes about this very issue while working at the Summer Paralympics in London.

“Wheelchair athletes from wealthier countries would only use each catheter once while athletes from developing countries would clean and reuse their catheters again and again,” said Dr. Andrei Krassioukov, a professor of medicine at UBC and chair in rehabilitation research with ICORD. “The athletes who used catheters only once experienced three-to-four times fewer urinary tract infections than athletes who reused catheters.”

Study to probe heart health, spinal cord injury link

Published: February 25, 2012

VANCOUVER — Marni Abbott-Peter has won three gold medals over years of playing basketball around the globe.

It wasn’t until she got out of the game that she realized keeping her heart in good shape would feel like jumping through hoops.

The 46-year-old retired Paralympic athlete has used a wheelchair since crushing her spine in a downhill skiing accident at age 18.