Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: brain computer interface

Repairing a highway: how can we fix spinal cord injury?

Published: October 25, 2019

The functional sophistication of the spinal cord can have devastating consequences. Will modern scientific developments replicate its functions?

The “central nervous system” delicately orchestrates the complex concerto of our mental and physical faculties, from perception through to action and all the intermediary processes in-between. Such functional sophistication is disturbed in spinal cord injury, which can have devastating short-term and long-term consequences, determined by the level and severity of the injury.

Neuroprosthetic Enables Tetraplegic Patient to Walk

Published: October 16, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A tetraplegic is one who has suffered partial or total loss of use of all four limbs and torso.

Each year, it is estimated that 250,000 to 500,000 people worldwide suffer a spinal cord injury, and that 59 percent of those living with the injury are tetraplegic—experiencing the total loss of use of all four limbs and torso. Innovative research from Clinatec and the Université Grenoble Alpes (UGA) has resulted in a first for a tetraplegic patient. Using a four-limb exoskeleton controlled by a neuroprosthetic, he was able to walk and use his arms.

The Lancet Neurology: Pioneering study suggests that an exoskeleton for tetraplegia could be feasible

Published: October 3, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A 4-limb robotic system controlled by brain signals helped a tetraplegic man to move his arms and walk using a ceiling-mounted harness for balance

Brain-controlled, non-invasive muscle stimulation allows chronic paraplegics to walk

Published: May 15, 2019

In another major clinical breakthrough of the Walk Again Project, a nonprofit international consortium aimed at developing new neurorehabilitation protocols, technologies, and therapies for spinal cord injury, two patients with paraplegia regained the ability to walk with minimal assistance, via a fully non-invasive brain-machine interface that does not require the use of any invasive spinal cord surgical procedure. The results of this study appeared in the May 1 issue of Scientific Reports.

This Neural Implant Accesses Your Brain Through the Jugular Vein

Published: April 7, 2019

The brain-computer interface lets paralyzed people type using their thoughts.

Brain-Computer Interface

For the first time, doctors are preparing to test a brain-computer interface that can be implanted onto a human brain, no open surgery required.

The Stentrode, a neural implant that can let paralyzed people communicate, can be delivered to a patient’s brain through the jugular vein — and the company that developed it, Synchron, just got approval to begin human experimentation.

Transforming Thoughts to Movement Offers New Hope for Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: March 28, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

What if paralyzed limbs could move using only the power of one’s thoughts? Borrowing a story line from the realm of science fiction, a team of researchers at The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis—together with neurosurgeons and biomedical engineers from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine—are using a brain-machine interface to make this once seemingly impossible feat a reality for victims of spinal cord injury (SCI). Seeking innovative ways to restore function after SCI is one of the central goals for The Miami Project, which was founded in 1985 and has grown to become one of the “crown jewels” of the Miller School of Medicine—and a model for other institutions developing centers for SCI research.

People with tetraplegia gain rapid use of brain-computer interface

Published: January 24, 2018

For a brain-computer interface (BCI) to be truly useful for a person with tetraplegia, it should be ready whenever it’s needed, with minimal expert intervention, including the very first time it’s used. In a new study in the Journal of Neural Engineering, researchers in the BrainGate collaboration demonstrate new techniques that allowed three participants to achieve peak BCI performance within three minutes of engaging in an easy, one-step process.

One participant, “T5,” a 63-year-old man who had never used a BCI before, needed only 37 seconds of calibration time before he could control a computer cursor to reach targets on a screen, just by imagining using his hand to move a joystick.

This hand exoskeleton for people with paralysis can be controlled by brainwaves

Published: January 23, 2018

People with limited mobility or paralysis could be able to use their hands again thanks to a robotic exoskeleton which can be controlled by brainwaves.

The lightweight and portable devices are being developed in the Geneva lab of Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and can restore functional grasps for those with physical impairments.

It is hoped that refined versions of the kit will allow people to complete meaningful daily tasks.

UCI heads $8 million NSF-funded project to develop brain-computer interface

Published: September 13, 2017

Implantable technology to restore sensation and walking in spinal cord injury patients

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 13, 2017 — The National Science Foundation has awarded $8 million to a consortium led by the University of California, Irvine to develop a brain-computer interface that can restore walking ability and sensation in individuals with spinal cord injury. This initiative represents the largest NSF award received by faculty researchers in the UCI engineering and medicine schools.

Virtual Reality Is Now Helping Paralyzed Patients Walk Again

Published: September 1, 2017

Brain Machine Interface plus Virtual Reality plus Exoskeletons, this is all that it takes to trigger the recovery of patients affected by Spinal Cord injuries.

A recent study published in the journal known as ‘Scientific Reports’ by researchers at Duke University showed 8 patients, completely or partially paralyzed, who regained some of their muscle activity and sensation in the lower limbs. This happened as a result of a rigorous training regimen using non-invasive and mind-controlled exoskeletons and virtual reality (VR) system. Miguel Nicolelis and colleagues developed this system that stimulates patient’s brain activity to take control of its limb movement by triggering the injured portions of the spinal cord to re-engage.

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