Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Tag: brain computer interface

SDSU’s Brain Chip Could Eliminate Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis

Published: October 26, 2015

SDSU’s Brain Chip Could Eliminate Spinal Cord Injury ParalysisResearchers at San Diego State University and two other schools won a $15 million grant to continue their work on a brain chip that could help people with traumatic spinal cord injuries undo the effects of paralysis, it was announced Monday.

The work done by the SDSU researchers — along with teams at the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — for the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering is aimed at helping paralyzed people regain mobility.

Without An Exoskeleton, Paralyzed Man Uses Brain Control To Walk

Published: September 28, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

brain-controlled-walking-testA man who is at the center of a new project being conducted by researchers from the University of California Irvine is giving hope to people with spinal cord injuries who have lost their ability to move their limbs that they will be able to one day walk again. Paralyzed for five years, an unnamed 26-year old was able to walk on his own with only a harness to help support his weight.

What makes this achievement so groundbreaking is that he was able to move using his own brainwaves without an exoskeleton to hold up his frame. Instead, electrodes were attached directly to his muscles so that he could control them, bypassing his injured spinal cord.

Paraplegic recounts relearning to walk via brain-computer link

Published: September 26, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Paraplegic Adam FritzFirst person paralysed from waist down to walk without use of robotics

For paraplegic Adam Fritz, the thrill of the computer-assisted first steps he took five years after being paralysed in a motorcycle crash came only after he was unhooked from the system that enabled him to walk briefly in a bioengineering lab.

During the experiment itself, Fritz recounted, he had to keep his mind focused entirely on placing one foot in front of the other as his brain waves were translated by a computer algorithm into impulses that bypassed his severed spinal cord and activated his legs.

Neurotechnology Provides Near-Natural Sense of Touch

Published: September 11, 2015

Neurotechnology Provides Near-Natural Sense of TouchRevolutionizing Prosthetics program achieves goal of restoring sensation

A 28-year-old who has been paralyzed for more than a decade as a result of a spinal cord injury has become the first person to be able to “feel” physical sensations through a prosthetic hand directly connected to his brain, and even identify which mechanical finger is being gently touched.

The advance, made possible by sophisticated neural technologies developed under DARPA’s Revolutionizing Prosthetics points to a future in which people living with paralyzed or missing limbs will not only be able to manipulate objects by sending signals from their brain to robotic devices, but also be able to sense precisely what those devices are touching.

Mind-Controlled Virtual Keyboard Helps Paralysis Patients; Nearly As Good As One-Finger Typing

Published: August 5, 2015

mind-controlled-keyboardPeople with spinal cord injuries and neurological diseases often struggle to communicate with the outside world. While researchers have developed thought-controlled keypads to help bridge that gap, sampling errors — misread damaged brain signals — have limited prostheses’ precision in translating people’s thoughts. A team of engineers at Stanford University have recently designed a technique to more accurately read those damaged brain cell signals using a virtual keyboard that is more precise than its predecessor technology. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, may lead to the fastest mind-controlled prostheses to date.

Next Generation of Neuroprosthetics: Erik’s Story

Published: May 21, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Paralyzed from the neck down after suffering a gunshot wound when he was 21, Erik G. Sorto now can move a robotic arm just by thinking about it

After years of paralysis, a man drinks a beer with the help of a...

Published: May 21, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

man drinks a beer with the help of a mind-reading robotA new thought-controlled robotic arm taps into a different part of the brain than most, which its creators say may give its paralyzed users an easier learning curve and allow for more fluid movements. They report on the success of their first patient, Erik G. Sorto, in a paper published Thursday in Science.

When Sorto, paralyzed from the neck down for a decade by a gunshot wound, signed on to have neuroprosthetics implanted in his brain, he was very clear on what his first goal would be: After years of having to ask someone to hold straws to his lips, he wanted to be able to drink a beer on his own. His medical team now reports that he’s accomplished that and more.

Controlling a Robotic Arm with a Patient’s Intentions

Published: May 21, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Neural prosthetic devices implanted in the brain’s movement center, the motor cortex, can allow patients with amputations or paralysis to control the movement of a robotic limb—one that can be either connected to or separate from the patient’s own limb.

Brain implant controls robotic arm – with the power of thought

Published: May 21, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Erik Sorto controls robotic armErik Sorto, a 34-year old American, has been unable to move his arms or legs for more than a decade, since a gunshot wound left him paralysed from the neck down. Even now, he misses the little things.

“I want to be able to drink my own beer – to be able to take a drink at my own pace, when I want to take a sip out of my beer and to not have to ask somebody to give it to me,” he said. “I really miss that independence.”

Sorto was recently able to fulfil this goal, when he became the first person in the world to have a neuro-prosthetic device implanted in a region of the brain where intentions are made.

Mind-control exoskeleton gives unprecedented paralysis recovery

Published: April 15, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Finding her feet againAn exoskeleton that enables movement and provides tactile feedback has helped eight paralysed people regain sensation and move previously paralysed muscles

“I FELT the ball!” yelled Juliano Pinto as he kicked off the Football World Cup in Brazil last year. Pinto, aged 29 at the time, lost the use of his lower body after a car accident in 2006. “It was the most moving moment,” says Miguel Nicolelis at Duke University in North Carolina, head of the Walk Again Project, which developed the thought-controlled exoskeleton that enabled Pinto to make his kick.

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