Saturday, April 4, 2020

Tag: brain computer interface

Man with quadriplegia employs injury bridging technologies to move again—just by thinking

Published: March 28, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

First recipient of implanted brain-recording and muscle-stimulating systems reanimates limb that had been stilled for eight years.

Brain-computer interface advance allows fast, accurate typing by people with paralysis

Published: February 21, 2017

In a Stanford-led research report, three participants with movement impairment controlled an onscreen cursor simply by imagining their own hand movements.

A clinical research publication led by Stanford University investigators has demonstrated that a brain-to-computer hookup can enable people with paralysis to type via direct brain control at the highest speeds and accuracy levels reported to date.

Big Improvements to Brain-Computer Interface

Published: February 15, 2017

Newly developed “glassy carbon” electrodes transmit more robust signals to restore motion in people with damaged spinal cords.

When people suffer spinal cord injuries and lose mobility in their limbs, it’s a neural signal processing problem. The brain can still send clear electrical impulses and the limbs can still receive them, but the signal gets lost in the damaged spinal cord.

If other paralyzed primates walk, will humans?

Published: December 23, 2016

paralyzed primates walkIn the annals of breathtaking scientific advances, it’s hard to top this recent news headline: “Paralyzed Monkeys Can Walk Again With Wireless Brain-Spine Connection.”

This is legit? Yes. How so? Scientists implant a chip in a monkey’s brain that sends wireless signals through a computer to electrodes in the lower back. The system stimulates a neural pathway that controls the muscles involved in walking.

Voila, the paralyzed primate walks.

Brain implants allow paralysed monkeys to walk

Published: November 9, 2016

Swiss researchers travel to China to conduct pioneering experiment.

For more than a decade, neuroscientist Grégoire Courtine has been flying every few months from his lab at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne to another lab in Beijing, China, where he conducts research on monkeys with the aim of treating spinal-cord injuries.

Quadriplegic man feels touch on robotic hand with brain implant

Published: October 13, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

nathan-copeland-feels-the-touchThis could be the most touchy-feely robotic limb yet. For the first time, brain stimulation has made it possible for a paralysed person to experience the sensation of touch via a bionic hand.

Robert Gaunt at the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and his team achieved this by implanting electrodes in the brain of Nathan Copeland, a 28-year-old quadriplegic.

These were inserted into the region of the brain that registers touch from the hand, and linked to a robotic hand in the same room via a computer. When this robotic hand was touched, it triggered stimulation of Copeland’s brain. “He feels these sensations coming from his own paralysed hand,” says Gaunt.

Gesture-controlled Internet of Things (IoT) extends freedom for the disabled

Published: September 26, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

superman-1529274_1920-100684161Quadriplegics can do more on their own with the Sesame Enable app that uses head gestures to control Internet of Things (IoT) devices

Christopher Reeve is famous as Superman in movies. As the man of steel with amazing superpowers, he was unbeatable.

In real life, though, a bad fall from his horse left Reeve a quadriplegic. How suddenly life changes. One day you’re a hero with superpowers. The next day you’ve lost control of your body.

Using VR and an exoskeletons to help paraplegics regain movement

Published: August 12, 2016

brain-machine-interfaceAfter twelve months, eight patients and 2,052 sessions spread over 1,958 hours, Duke University is publishing some promising results from a study seeking to demonstrate the ability for brain-machine interfaces to help restore mobility in humans.

The study, which appeared this week in Scientific Reports, looked at a group of paraplegic patients suffering from a chronic spinal cord injury. The system utilized a brain-machine interface featuring an Oculus Rift headset that simulated the effect of having a neurological connection to their lower limbs. The system was also capable of moving a pair of robotic actuators to actually create movement.

Bioelectronic devices to improve quality of life after SCI

Published: March 3, 2016

Bioelectronic devices that record and stimulate the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nerves have potential to dramatically improve function after injury or disease.

Biorobotic bladders: breakthrough treatment for spinal injury

Published: February 26, 2016

lawn-wheelchair“Research in this field is progressing but, predictably, has a long way to go”

Believe it or not, we are electrical creatures. Each and every living cell in your body is electrically active. The sodium-potassium pump, which you may remember from secondary school biology, pumps sodium ions out of the cell and potassium ions in, creating a difference in charge across the cell membrane. Neurons exploit these differences in charge and ion concentrations to rapidly carry signals down the length of their cell bodies and trigger the release of chemical messengers.

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