Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: Cancer

Disabled golfer becomes first worldwide to captain an able-bodied club

Published: February 5, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A golfer who uses just one arm to play his shots is set to become the world’s first paraplegic captain of an able-bodied club.

Terry Kirby, 63, was a budding new golfer before – in a devastating turn of events – he lost all feeling below his chest following the removal of a tumour found on his spinal cord.

Mr Kirby, who had one leg shorter than the other, was visiting the doctors in 1994 to be given a shoe stint.

However, he was rushed to hospital after a doctor commented on the weakness of his legs.

How Makeup Artist Steph Aiello Pursued Her Cosmetology Career After Becoming Quadriplegic

Published: February 19, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

In 2010, one day before she was supposed to start cosmetology school, Steph Aiello was involved in a car crash that left her paralyzed from the waist down with limited ability to move her hands and one of her closest friends dead. She would spend the next several months in rehab, gaining sensation in half of her back, but battling major anxiety and depression. A few months later, she found herself in another accident when a drunk driver crashed into the car her family was in, just one block from the hospital. Aiello was also diagnosed with cancer shortly after. And yet, in the face of such adversity, Aiello’s courage and resilience not only helped her beat cancer and become stronger, it also motivated her to pursue her love of makeup.

Spinal Cord Injury Patients Face Many Serious Health Problems Besides Paralysis

Published: February 16, 2017

MAYWOOD, IL –  Paralysis is just one of the many serious health problems faced by patients who suffer spinal cord injuries.

Spinal cord patients also are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease; pneumonia; life-threatening blood clots; bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction; constipation and other gastrointestinal problems; pressure ulcers; and chronic pain, according to a report published in the journal Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.

Nutlins cancer drug may be able to reverse spinal cord damage

Published: May 31, 2015

spinal cord injury-lab-ratsLONDON, UK – A group of drugs being tested for cancer treatment have been shown to present promising results for spinal cord injury in mice, according to a new report.

The cancer drug called Nutlins was administered to mice as part of a cancer study, but doctors discovered that mice taking the drug recovered much more movement than those left untreated.

The Imperial College London has said the drugs should now be tested in rats and could possibly be used in human trials within 10 years.

Bladder cancer mortality after spinal cord injury over 4 decades – Abstract

Published: March 5, 2015

urotoday logoBladder cancer mortality was not significantly increased for ventilator users, those with motor incomplete injuries, or those injured less than 10 years.

PURPOSE: To estimate the bladder cancer mortality in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), as compared to the general population.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data and statistics were retrieved from the National SCI Statistical Center and National Center for Health Statistics.

Cancer Drug Improves Movement in Rats with Spine Injury

Published: January 30, 2011

Researchers say the anti-cancer drug Taxol, normally used to treat breast cancer, might also hold promise as a way to help people recover from crippling spinal cord injuries.

Researchers at Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Germany report that Taxol improves movement and function in rats with spine injuries, by promoting nerve regeneration. They say the drug appears to eliminate the physical obstacles that normally prevent injured nerve cells from regrowing axons.

Cancer Drug Aids The Regeneration Of Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: January 28, 2011

Taxol stabilizes growing nerve cells and reduces the barrier-function of scar tissue

After a spinal cord injury a number of factors impede the regeneration of nerve cells. Two of the most important of these factors are the destabilization of the cytoskeleton and the development of scar tissue. While the former prevents regrowth of cells, the latter creates a barrier for severed nerve cells. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried and their colleagues from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and University of Miami in the United States, and the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, have now shown that the cancer drug Taxol reduces both regeneration obstacles. Science, January 27, 2011

The Brave Ability Of Joni Tada

Published: November 19, 2010

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Especially when it’s a discarded wheelchair.

Tens of thousands of disabled people in developing countries enjoy the dignity of moving about in rehabilitated wheelchairs, thanks to Joni Eareckson Tada.

The minister and disability-rights advocate has touched countless lives with her wheelchair project.

But she might never have had such an impact had it not been for one fateful summer day in 1967.

Just 17, she dived off a raft in Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay and fractured her spinal cord, paralyzing herself from the neck down.

Everett talks about his recovery from paralysis

Published: October 12, 2010

HOUSTON (KTRK) — Three years ago, a hit on the football field left Kevin Everett paralyzed. He became one of the 300,000 Americans living with spinal cord injuries.

Everett has recovered from his injury, and he credits his faith, rehab and something rarely done for spinal cord injury: cooling.

In 2007, Everett’s promising career with the Buffalo Bills came to an end with one hit.

Governor signs spinal cord injury research bill

Published: October 3, 2010

San Jose, CA (October 3) — Students and teachers rejoiced! Athletes rejoiced! So with parents and advocates of spinal cord injury research, who applauded Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signing into law the bill extending the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Act which was set to expire January 1, 2011.

The bill was sponsored by Assemblyman Alberto Torrico enabling the state to continue California’s spinal cord research fund through the University of California.

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