Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Tag: diving accident

Memoirs of a Body – A Short Documentary

Published: April 10, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

A short documentary called Memoirs of a Body, which takes a unique look at how we physically embody our sense of self through the life of Josh “Staff” Marshbanks.

Quadriplegic retrofits truck to accommodate special needs

Published: December 28, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Ryan Baetke's modified accessible truckLingering cleanup chores, tasks he didn’t attend to during the holiday weekend, consume Ryan Baetke’s Monday night at his home just north of Davenport.

From the seat of his motorized wheelchair, the 48-year-old sweeps the floor of his garage as his “sidekick,” a golden retriever named Annie, gnaws on a bone. As he scoops the dust into a garbage can, Baetke motions to another sidekick nearby.

At first glance, the 2015 GMC Sierra parked in the adjacent bay doesn’t appear to be anything special.

Just Don’t Dive! Go in Feet First to Avoid Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: August 1, 2016

Diving into a pool or lake during summer activities may land you in a wheelchair for the rest of your life; over 800 people per year suffer a spinal cord injury from diving in head first. These injuries are preventable—just remember to always go in feet first when entering pools, ponds, lakes, and the ocean.

Perhaps you didn’t see a sign warning you of danger. Maybe you didn’t know that the “No Diving” sign meant the water was too shallow. Or you thought the water was deep enough because it had been the last time you dove in. But 1000 other people thought that too and ended up with broken necks, paralysis, or even worse, didn’t make it through the injury.

UPMC’s clinical trial showing promise with spinal cord injuries

Published: February 26, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Michael-FraserThree years ago, Michael Fraser broke his neck in a diving accident near his Vandergrift home but remembers little about it.

But in April, the man with quadriplegia underwent an experimental neural stem-cell procedure that wasn’t only a life-changing experience but could represent the first interventional treatment for spinal cord injuries.

Mr. Fraser, 24, now can lift himself from his wheelchair into bed without assistance. He breathes more freely and deeply and has greater core strength with better dexterity. Previously he could manage only a half-mile on his arm-powered elliptical but now does two to three miles, he said.