Friday, November 15, 2019

Tag: Exoskeleton

Neuroprosthetic Enables Tetraplegic Patient to Walk

Published: October 16, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A tetraplegic is one who has suffered partial or total loss of use of all four limbs and torso.

Each year, it is estimated that 250,000 to 500,000 people worldwide suffer a spinal cord injury, and that 59 percent of those living with the injury are tetraplegic—experiencing the total loss of use of all four limbs and torso. Innovative research from Clinatec and the Université Grenoble Alpes (UGA) has resulted in a first for a tetraplegic patient. Using a four-limb exoskeleton controlled by a neuroprosthetic, he was able to walk and use his arms.

The Lancet Neurology: Pioneering study suggests that an exoskeleton for tetraplegia could be feasible

Published: October 3, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A 4-limb robotic system controlled by brain signals helped a tetraplegic man to move his arms and walk using a ceiling-mounted harness for balance

This Neural Implant Accesses Your Brain Through the Jugular Vein

Published: April 7, 2019

The brain-computer interface lets paralyzed people type using their thoughts.

Brain-Computer Interface

For the first time, doctors are preparing to test a brain-computer interface that can be implanted onto a human brain, no open surgery required.

The Stentrode, a neural implant that can let paralyzed people communicate, can be delivered to a patient’s brain through the jugular vein — and the company that developed it, Synchron, just got approval to begin human experimentation.

Kessler Foundation Highlights Research Advances at 2018 UN International Day of Persons with Disabilities

Published: November 29, 2018

International Day of Persons with DisabilitiesFoundation demonstrates the application of wearable robotics for individuals with spinal cord injury at United Nations program, The Art of the Possible

Each year, the United Nations commemorates the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (UNIDPD) on December 3. This year, Kessler Foundation joins the IDPD program to demonstrate the contributions of rehabilitation research toward empowering people with disabilities and ensuring inclusiveness and equality across all nations. The application of new technologies, such as robotics, virtual reality, and smart devices, is a major strategy scientists are using for finding new ways to help people recover from disabling injuries and illnesses.

Brain-controlled robot helps people learn to walk again

Published: March 9, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A new robotic treatment device helping people with spinal cord injuries learn to walk again can only be found in one place in the United States; Brooks Rehabilitation in Jacksonville.

This hand exoskeleton for people with paralysis can be controlled by brainwaves

Published: January 23, 2018

People with limited mobility or paralysis could be able to use their hands again thanks to a robotic exoskeleton which can be controlled by brainwaves.

The lightweight and portable devices are being developed in the Geneva lab of Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and can restore functional grasps for those with physical impairments.

It is hoped that refined versions of the kit will allow people to complete meaningful daily tasks.

Spinal Cord Research Participant Shares Journey to Recovery

Published: November 21, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Steve Adubato goes on-location to the Kessler Foundation’s 16th annual “Stroll ‘N Roll” and speaks with Rosalie Hannigan, a Kessler spinal cord research participant, about her accident and her journey to recover her mobility.

What’s the Latest in Spinal Cord Injury Technology?

Published: September 12, 2017

Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) patients come to Burke’s inpatient acute rehabilitation program directly from the hospital/trauma center where they were treated and stabilized to prevent further damage to the spinal cord. Once at Burke, an intensive rehabilitation phase begins.

Physical therapy is crucial at this stage, because many of the gains the patient will make in movement happen during this time. Strengthening muscles and improving flexibility shapes the individual’s ability to make ongoing progress afterwards.

Virtual Reality Is Now Helping Paralyzed Patients Walk Again

Published: September 1, 2017

Brain Machine Interface plus Virtual Reality plus Exoskeletons, this is all that it takes to trigger the recovery of patients affected by Spinal Cord injuries.

A recent study published in the journal known as ‘Scientific Reports’ by researchers at Duke University showed 8 patients, completely or partially paralyzed, who regained some of their muscle activity and sensation in the lower limbs. This happened as a result of a rigorous training regimen using non-invasive and mind-controlled exoskeletons and virtual reality (VR) system. Miguel Nicolelis and colleagues developed this system that stimulates patient’s brain activity to take control of its limb movement by triggering the injured portions of the spinal cord to re-engage.

Robotics are helping paralyzed people walk again, but the price tag is huge

Published: June 12, 2017

EKSO Bionics ExoskeletonAshley Barnes was 35 years old when doctors told her she would never walk again.

A botched spinal procedure in 2014 paralyzed her from the waist down. The Tyler, Tex., resident had been an avid runner, clocking six miles daily when not home with her then-9-year-old autistic son, whom she raised alone. Life in a wheelchair was not an option.

“I needed to be the best mom I could be,” Barnes said. “I needed to be up and moving.”

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