Thursday, December 5, 2019

Tag: Frazier Rehab Institute

How a revolutionary technique got people with spinal-cord injuries back on their feet

Published: July 31, 2019

Electrical stimulation has promised huge gains for people with paralysis. Now comes the hard part — getting beyond those first steps.

Rob Summers was flat on his back at a rehabilitation institute in Kentucky when he realized he could wiggle his big toe. Up, down, up, down. This was new — something he hadn’t been able to do since a hit-and-run driver left him paralysed from the chest down. When that happened four years earlier, doctors had told him that he would never move his lower body again. Now he was part of a pioneering experiment to test the power of electrical stimulation in people with spinal-cord injuries.

How UofL spinal cord study is helping one man make strides back to full...

Published: May 16, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

The program was home to someone who went from full traumatic spinal injury, to being able to walk again

UofL researchers report activity-based training improves urinary function after spinal cord injury

Published: February 1, 2018

Activity-based training has resulted in unexpected benefits for individuals with severe spinal cord injury. Researchers in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center at the University of Louisville have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire.

Research participants receiving activity-based training conducted by KSCIRC at Frazier Rehab Institute initially reported improvements in bladder, bowel and sexual function anecdotally. Charles Hubscher, PhD, professor and researcher at KSCIRC, has documented those changes in research published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

The Doctors Said He’d Never Walk. So His Parents Took Him on a Trip...

Published: August 31, 2015

Before he was even born, Evander Conroy had a fight on his hands.

UofL, Frazier Rehab equipment gives hope to paralyzed children

Published: July 30, 2015

LOUISVILLE, Ky. —The University of Louisville and Frazier Rehab unveiled new equipment Thursday that’s giving hope to children who are paralyzed.

Program teaches paralyzed how to walk – again

Published: February 2, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

gunshot left Kyle Bartolini paralyzedAn accidental gunshot left Kyle Bartolini paralyzed as a preschooler. But today, he’s an active teenager who can get around with crutches or a walker and loves to fish, swim, kayak and play paintball.

He owes this transformation to an exercise-based therapy that teaches lost skills to broken nervous systems. Called locomotor training, it allows people with spinal cord injuries to practice standing and stepping while suspended above a treadmill. University of Louisville Neurosurgery Professor Andrea Behrman is pioneering the treatment in children in a new pediatric program.

Patients with spinal cord injuries learning to walk again

Published: July 16, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Collin HumphreyLOUISVILLE, Ky. —Two men who were told they’d never walk again are defying odds with help from Frazier Rehab.

Frazier Rehab is making their mobility possible through its research and special equipment and many institutes are following suit.

Both of the men were in serious car accidents that left them with fractured spinal cords.

One man lost feeling from the chest down.

But now, not only does he have sensation back — he’s also regained his independence.

UofL research shows that patients benefit from spinal cord rehab network, locomotor training

Published: September 5, 2012

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (Sept. 5, 2012) — Research studies from teams headed by a University of Louisville/Frazier Rehab Institute neuroscientist published online this week demonstrate for the first time that innovative rehabilitative treatments for individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) can lead to significant functional improvements in patients and a higher quality of life.

Eleven studies published in the September issue of the “Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation” conclude that establishing a network of rehab centers for SCI that standardizes treatment can lead to significant functional improvements for chronically injured patients.

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