Saturday, June 6, 2020

Tag: Gregoire Courtine

Regenerating Axons Across Complete Spinal Cord Injury

Published: August 31, 2018

In a collaboration led by EPFL (Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne) in Switzerland and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) in the USA, scientists have now understood the underlying biological mechanisms required for severed nerve fibers to regenerate across complete spinal cord injury, bridging that gap in mice and rats for the first time.

The adult mammalian body has an incredible ability to heal itself in response to injury. Yet, injuries to the spinal cord lead to devastating conditions, since severed nerve fibers fail to regenerate in the central nervous system. Consequently, the brain’s electrical commands about body movement no longer reach the muscles, leading to complete and permanent paralysis.

One Small Step for a Paraplegic, One Big Step Toward Reversing Paralysis

Published: March 14, 2017

In a hospital in Switzerland, permanently paralyzed people are now learning to walk again with the help of stimulating electrodes implanted in their spines. For Grégoire Courtine, professor of neuroprosthetics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), this day has been a long time coming. “It took us 15 years to get from paralyzed rats to the first steps in humans,” he says. “Maybe in 10 more years, our technology will be ready for the clinic.”

Courtine has made it his mission to reverse paralysis. He started 15 years ago with those paralyzed rats, putting tiny electrical implants into their spines to stimulate nerve fibers below the site of their spinal cord injuries.

Brain implants allow paralysed monkeys to walk

Published: November 9, 2016

Swiss researchers travel to China to conduct pioneering experiment.

For more than a decade, neuroscientist Grégoire Courtine has been flying every few months from his lab at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne to another lab in Beijing, China, where he conducts research on monkeys with the aim of treating spinal-cord injuries.

The scurry for a spinal injuries cure

Published: June 1, 2012

IT WAS one small step for a rat, but it may be one giant leap for mankind.

Rats paralysed by spinal injuries have learned to walk, and run, again after groundbreaking treatment which “awakens the spinal brain” and helps the spine to repair itself.

Australian experts yesterday hailed the successful research as bringing science to “the edge of a truly profound advance in modern medicine” by allowing paralysed people to walk again.

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