Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: Injury Prevention

Helpful tools for cooking when you have a spinal cord injury

Published: November 18, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

This video shows two people with cervical spinal cord injuries preparing a complex meal using adaptive tools along with regular kitchen items that make cooking possible.

Nurses’ role in both prevention and treatment of cervical and lumbar injuries

Published: May 21, 2018

A spinal cord injury is devastating for a patient, their family and their caregivers. Every 44 minutes a person sustains a spinal cord injury (SCI) in the United States resulting in approximately 12,000 SCIs each year.1 There are more than 265,000 persons currently living with this type of injury in the United States, and one out of every 50 persons lives with paralysis. 1 So as nurses, what can we do to reduce the risk of spinal cord injury in hopes of positively affecting these statistics?

Just Don’t Dive! Go in Feet First to Avoid Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: August 1, 2016

Diving into a pool or lake during summer activities may land you in a wheelchair for the rest of your life; over 800 people per year suffer a spinal cord injury from diving in head first. These injuries are preventable—just remember to always go in feet first when entering pools, ponds, lakes, and the ocean.

Perhaps you didn’t see a sign warning you of danger. Maybe you didn’t know that the “No Diving” sign meant the water was too shallow. Or you thought the water was deep enough because it had been the last time you dove in. But 1000 other people thought that too and ended up with broken necks, paralysis, or even worse, didn’t make it through the injury.

Breaking Bad: Dozens Of Tourists Suffer Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: January 11, 2016

Too many people are ignoring or simply not understanding the warning signs posted at many public beaches.

Just hours after starting his Hawaii vacation, Todd Duitsman was paralyzed from the neck down.

Duitsman and his family flew from Seattle to Maui in July 2014. They dropped their bags at their condo, got a bite to eat and drove straight to Makena’s Big Beach.

An hour later, Duitsman was body surfing in the shore break.

Parents recall their son’s C-spine injury 14 years later

Published: September 11, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

chad+surfing+in+nicaraguaCAPE MAY – September has been described as “locals summer,” when the air and water are still warm, and the beaches are not crowded. Chad deSatnick, then 23, was surfing off Poverty Beach, Sept. 30, as he had many times before growing up in Cape May. At the end of his last run, however, his surfboard struck the steep beach break created over the last 10 or 11 years of a state and federally subsidized beach replenishment program. When the board hit the severely sloping sand, deSatnick was toss head first into the hard, wet sand.

His neck hurt, he knew that much, but he was still able to function. He walked around for about a day and a half before his father noticed his was holding his arms away from his body. When asked what was wrong, Chad told his father his arms were tingling.

Think first to help prevent brain, spinal cord and other traumatic injuries

Published: July 3, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

ThinkFirst logoBilly Roussel is a risk taker. Always has been.

So when he saw a platform high in a tree with a cable over the waters of Lake Bistineau while fishing with 12-year-old son Seth, he didn’t hesitate to shimmy up to it and jump.

“My last words to my son were ‘Here goes nothing.’ When I made the swing, I couldn’t hold on to the cable. I ended up hitting the ground, bouncing off a cypress knee into the water. I knew I had done something. I couldn’t lift my head, I couldn’t move my arms or legs.”

Don’t dive into a life-changing injury: Use common sense to stay safe in pools...

Published: August 8, 2014

Dr. Charles Tator“My boyfriend picked me up and threw me in the pool. I floated to the surface face down and was drowning before he rolled me over and saved my life – but he broke my spinal cord.”

“I had never been on that dock before, and it went so far out into the water. How was I supposed to know that at the end of the dock the water was less than one metre deep.”

As a brain and spinal surgeon, I have mixed feelings when the warm weather finally arrives in Canada.

Quadriplegic Mark Manion shares his story

Published: August 2, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Mark Manion is a quadriplegic with a compelling story.

HEALTH LINE: No Diving Into Lakes, Rivers and Oceans

Published: May 23, 2014

No DivingExperts Advise Against Diving Into Natural Bodies of Water

What lurks beneath the water?

It sounds like a horror story title, and it certainly can be when a spinal cord injury results from diving into natural bodies of water such as lakes, rivers and oceans, where visibility is low and rock and debris can be hidden from view.

Having fun at the lake and staying safe are not mutually exclusive, but experts say it is never advisable to dive into any body of water where you can’t see under the surface, no matter how many times you’ve been diving there before.

The SENSIMAT for Wheelchairs – Indiegogo Campaign

Published: March 24, 2014

SENSIMATThe SENSIMAT for Wheelchairs is a thin, wireless mat of pressure sensors that is inserted underneath a wheelchair cushion. The mat connects via Bluetooth to the SENSIMAT mobile app which allows 24/7 monitoring of the wheelchair cushion.

The SENSIMAT is fully customized to your wheelchair cushion(ie. 16 inches front to back, 18 inches left to right). The SENSIMAT is inserted directly underneath your wheelchair cushion and zipped up in the existing wheelchair cushion sleeve.

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