Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: Ireland

‘It’s to show them what we can do, not what we can’t do’

Published: June 17, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

Strength, skill and no-holds-barred hits: wheelchair hurling stars all set for international duty

The question was always coming, so obvious and predictable that they can see it sailing through the air long before it’s fired their way. Pat Carty and James McCarthy, the captain and vice-captain of the Irish wheelchair hurling team, know that before we talk sport, about the rich and varied abilities they’ve honed in recent years, there’ll be an inevitable query about their disabilities.

‘I never got to thank the stranger who saved my life’ – Coldplay fan...

Published: September 23, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Rob O’Byrne was left in a wheelchair after he dived into the shallow end of a swimming pool

A Dublin man has described his “nightmare holiday” after he was left paralysed in a freak accident while in Spain with his family.

Rob O’Byrne (29) from Co Dublin was drinking by the pool with his family when he jumped into the shallow end of the pool.

Northern Irish Gymnast Flies In To Walk Again

Published: July 18, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

northen-irish-gymnastTRAVELLING over 4,000 miles from her home town in Northern Ireland to Project Walk in Longwood, Orlando, bubbly Jennifer Smyth is on an epic journey, not to accumulate the rich life experiences of adventurous travel, but rather to regain her legs – the use of which she lost in a catastrophic gymnastic accident almost three years ago.

She explained: “Ever since I was a little girl I have been consumed by gymnastics and have devoted myself to the discipline of athletes, always pushing myself to be the best I can be. I don’t know any other way to live. The accident happened on a Tuesday evening after school, I was on my last vault before moving to the next event, and when I landed I just couldn’t move.

Stem cells – where are we now?

Published: January 27, 2012

RESEARCH: STEM CELLS: two small words that can invoke enormous hype, hope and sometimes confusion.

In theory harnessing them could open up new therapies for a range of medical conditions. In practice it’s a complex field, strewn with technical and, in some cases, ethical difficulties, but progress is being made, a small number of clinical applications have already been proved and more clinical trials are under way.

But first, in any discussion of stem cells there’s an important set of distinctions to make. Not all stem cells are the same – and how they are classified depends on where they came from.

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