Thursday, April 2, 2020

Tag: Mayo Clinic

Stem cells a step toward improving motor, sensory function after spinal cord injury

Published: November 27, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Early research at Mayo Clinic using stem cell therapy to treat spinal cord injuries has produced results for one patient that doctors describe as “beyond expectations.”

‘There’s definitely hope,’ Muskegon man receives rare stem cell therapy

Published: March 1, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Geoffrey CraigieGeoffrey Craigie, 29, suffered a traumatic spine injury on New Year’s Eve in 2017 that paralyzed him from the neck down.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Nobody knows exactly what happened on New Year’s Eve 2017 that caused a 29-year-old Muskegon man to lose all feeling in his body.

“Just jumped in and that was kind of it,” said Geoffrey Craigie. He was celebrating the holiday up in Traverse City with friends and family when he dove into the pool.

Life-changing injury leads to research career for Peter Grahn, Ph.D.

Published: February 6, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

WILLMAR — A diving accident the summer after he graduated from Willmar High School changed the whole course of Peter Grahn’s life.

The spinal cord injury he suffered was life-altering but it’s also what led him to his calling — as a researcher into the intricacies of neuromodulation at the Mayo Clinic.

The work he’s doing at Mayo could someday enable people like him to recover, even if only partially, from spinal cord injuries that limit their ability to walk, use their hands and move around freely.

Spinal cord stimulation, physical therapy help paralyzed man stand, walk with assistance

Published: September 24, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Spinal cord stimulation and physical therapy have helped a man paralyzed since 2013 regain his ability to stand and walk with assistance. The results, achieved in a research collaboration between Mayo Clinic and UCLA, are reported in Nature Medicine.

With an implanted stimulator turned on, the man, Jered Chinnock, was able to step with a front-wheeled walker while trainers provided occasional assistance.

The Risk of Sleep Apnea for Quadriplegics

Published: May 11, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Not sleeping well? A new study shows more than 70 percent of people with quadriplegia also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

For many years, the N-ABLE team has heard stories about friends with quadriplegia who don’t sleep well at night or who only sleep a few hours a night. We wondered if there was a medical reason for this. As it turns out, there is.

A new study in The Journal of Physiology tries to show why more than 70 percent of people with quadriplegia also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a medical condition that causes the upper airway to narrow and close repeatedly while people are asleep.

Spinal Cord Injury Research: Mayo Clinic Radio

Published: May 6, 2017

Dr. Kristin Zhao, director of Mayo Clinic’s Assistive and Restorative Technology Laboratory, and Dr. Kendall Lee, director of Mayo Clinic’s Neural Engineering Laboratory, will discuss research that has successfully used intense physical therapy and electrical stimulation of the spinal cord to return voluntary movements to a previously paralyzed patient.

Ten Questions with Dr. Peter Grahn

Published: April 18, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Dr Peter GrahnIn the summer of 2005 just graduated Willmar Cardinal basketball player Pete Grahn was enjoying a swim in Green Lake with friends when his life changed for good.

It was an exciting time for Pete, he had graduated from Willmar senior high and was headed for Minnesota State- Moorhead to play college basketball and get his degree in biology. Pete was a smooth shooting forward who was very athletic and according to his coach Steve Grove “really worked hard to make himself into great Willmar Cardinal. He had a sweet left hand jump shot, loved to shoot the three’s.”

Man moves paralyzed legs using device that stimulates spinal cord

Published: April 3, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Mayo Clinic researchers used electrical stimulation on the spinal cord and intense physical therapy to help a man intentionally move his paralyzed legs, stand and make steplike motions for the first time in three years.

The case, the result of collaboration with UCLA researchers, appears today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Researchers say these results offer further evidence that a combination of this technology and rehabilitation may help patients with spinal cord injuries regain control over previously paralyzed movements, such as steplike actions, balance control and standing.

Paralyzed woman takes her story ‘Beyond the Outhouse’

Published: November 30, 2012

ORONOCO – As Laurie Reese tells the story of how she broke her back, the natural instinct is to wait for the punchline.

“… and the outhouse fell on me.”

It’s not the punchline, though; it’s the reason she’s paralyzed from the waist down.

And now, it’s the title of the book she’s written, a book that’s helped in her healing process, Reese said.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!