Friday, January 17, 2020

Tag: Ohio State University

A common drug could help restore limb function after spinal cord injury

Published: December 3, 2019

In mouse study, nerve pain drug gabapentin promotes regeneration of neural circuits

Long-term treatment with gabapentin, a commonly prescribed drug for nerve pain, could help restore upper limb function after a spinal cord injury, new research in mice suggests.

In the study, mice treated with gabapentin regained roughly 60 percent of forelimb function in a skilled walking test, compared to restoration of approximately 30 percent of forelimb function in mice that received a placebo.

Bladder Function After Spinal Cord Injury May Be Improved by New Drug

Published: June 6, 2018

Upon testing the drug in mice models of spinal cord injury over a one-month period, they found that bladder volume decreased to near-normal size.

An experimental drug referred to as LM11A-31 could improve bladder function in patients who have sustained a spinal cord injury, according to researchers from The Ohio State University. The drug blocks pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) and a receptor known as p75 which contribute to abnormalities in communication between neurons when nerves have been injured.

Spinal Injuries Impact Gut Microbiome

Published: December 2, 2016

spinal-injuries-impact-gut-microbiomeThe gut microbiome undergoes changes after a patient suffers a spinal cord injury, according to a new study.

Researchers from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center used mice models of spinal cord injury in order to determine whether gut bacteria dysbiosis – or, functional interruption – affects the recovery of neurological function in patients after a traumatic spinal cord injury. The researchers wrote that this dysbiosis can both cause and exacerbate a number of diseases. The study authors studied changes in the mice’s microbiomes after their injuries for a month to predict the range of their locomotor impairment, they wrote.

Ohio State Scientists Explain How Gut Microbes Change After Spinal Cord Injury

Published: October 17, 2016

pop-phillipCOLUMBUS, Ohio – The community of bacteria that live in our intestines, also called the “gut microbiome,” is important to normal intestinal function. Knowing that spinal cord injuries often negatively affect the gut’s ability to do its job, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center showed that spinal cord injury causes profound changes in the gut microbiota. They also showed that feeding mice probiotics after a spinal cord injury confers neuroprotection and improves functional recovery.

The findings are published online today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Researchers find possible treatment for suppressed immunity from spine injuries

Published: April 18, 2016

abnormal nervous circuity in spinal cord injuryScientists report in Nature Neuroscience they have identified an underlying cause of dangerous immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries and they propose a possible treatment.

In the journal’s April 18 online edition, researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center and Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University write that spinal cord injuries higher than thoracic level 5 (T5) cause autonomic nervous system circuitry to develop a highly adaptable state of plasticity. The autonomic nervous system controls bodily functions that are not consciously directed – like breathing, heartbeat, digestion and immune function.

Quadriplegic man Ian Burkhart moves fingers, hand and wrist thanks to tiny computer chip...

Published: April 13, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

ian-burkhart-paralysed-moves-wrist-handA quadriplegic man has been able to move his fingers, hand and wrist after having a tiny computer chip implanted in his brain. The neuroprosthetic device, which is smaller than a pea, translates neural activity in order to activate paralysed muscles.

Ian Burkhart, a 24-year-old from Ohio, was paralysed following a diving accident six years ago. The injury to his spinal cord left him unable to move his arms and legs. Paralysis is caused by a disruption of signal pathways between the brain and muscles. Previously, researchers have been able to restore movement in humans with the aid of robotics or assistive devices, but movements without these aids has only ever been achieved in non-human primates.

Spinal Cord Injury Causes ‘Immune System Paralysis’

Published: March 7, 2016

brain-oxfordjournals-coverCOLUMBUS, Ohio – New research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is showing that spinal cord injuries can also cause a “paralysis” of the immune system that renders these patients more susceptible to pneumonia and other infections.

Findings of the study are published in the March issue of the journal Brain.

“Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. Patients with spinal cord injuries are 37 times more likely to die of pneumonia than those without these injuries,”

First Oral Drug for Spinal Cord Injury Improves Movement in Mice, Study Shows

Published: January 8, 2013

COLUMBUS, Ohio – An experimental oral drug given to mice after a spinal cord injury was effective at improving limb movement after the injury, a new study shows.

The compound efficiently crossed the blood-brain barrier, did not increase pain and showed no toxic effects to the animals.

“This is a first to have a drug that can be taken orally to produce functional improvement with no toxicity in a rodent model,” said Sung Ok Yoon, associate professor of molecular & cellular biochemistry at Ohio State University and lead author of the study. “So far, in the spinal cord injury field with rodent models, effective treatments have included more than one therapy, often involving invasive means. Here, with a single agent, we were able to obtain functional improvement.”

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