Friday, April 3, 2020

Tag: Paralympics

Rio Paralympics: Kurt Fearnley predicts ‘boosting’ cheats will get caught

Published: November 19, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Kurt FearnleyAustralia’s champion wheelchair racer Kurt Fearnley says from his first Paralympics, in Sydney 2000, he has heard stories about boosting – the practice among athletes with spinal cord injuries of inflicting trauma on themselves, such as breaking a toe or sitting on their scrotums, to raise their blood pressure and improve performance.

The International Paralympic Committee has announced that in the lead-up to the Rio Paralympics it will crack down on the illegal practice, which involves tricking the brain into triggering autonomic dysreflexia, which causes the body to flush with adrenaline.

Paralympian Jen French Announced as Conquer Paralysis Now’s First Champion

Published: July 22, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Conquer Paralysis NowFrench joins the Sam Schmidt Paralysis Foundation’s effort to cure paralysis in next decade.

St. Petersburg, FL (PRWEB) July 22, 2014 – Joining Conquer Paralysis Now as its first champion in the movement to cure paralysis in the next decade is Paralympic silver medalist and quadriplegic Jennifer French.

As a result of a snowboarding accident, French became a quadriplegic from a spinal cord injury in 1998. Now, she has joined a new effort to help find a cure for paralysis.

Paralympian turns politician

Published: May 18, 2013

Michelle Stilwell one of three B.C. MLAs with a physical disabilityParalympian turns politician

In much the way she views her wheelchair racing career – she is an athlete with a disability, not a disabled athlete – Michelle Stilwell isn’t overly interested in framing her new job as a politician by the fact she uses a chair.

The multiple Paralympic gold medallist won a provincial seat in her first try on Tuesday, holding on to Parksville-Qualicum for the Liberals.

Paralympics: Spinal Cord Injuries Open Door to ‘Boosting’

Published: September 4, 2012

Bryan Kirkland could always spot a booster. Sweaty arms, shaky legs and “chicken skin” were telltale signs of the dangerous practice, banned from the Paralympics for its performance-enhancing effects.

“All I could do was shake my head,” said Kirkland, 41, a Paralympic gold medalist from Leeds, Ala. “It’s so dangerous, and for what: so you can win a race?”

Like blood doping, boosting increases the amount of oxygenated blood circulating in the body. But instead of using blood transfusions and erythropoietin injections, boosters break their toes, block their catheters and crush their scrotums.

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