Sunday, December 15, 2019

Tag: respiratory

Spinal cord injury Veterans can now effectively cough

Published: August 2, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Researchers restore complete respiratory muscle function

VA doctors are among a team of researchers at the Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation Center restoring respiratory muscle function to Veterans and individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).

Doctors Anthony DiMarco and Krzysztof Kowalski developed the first method in the world that can activate expiratory muscles (abdominal and lower rib cage muscles), using minimally invasive techniques to produce an effective cough.

Sleep-Disordered Breathing: Imposing Challenges in Spinal Cord Injury

Published: January 4, 2019

Patients with spinal cord injury or disease (SCI/D) are 3 to 4 times more likely to have sleep disordered breathing (SDB) than individuals in the general population. The prevalence of SDB — both central and obstructive sleep apnea — ranges from 27% to 82% in patients with subacute and chronic SCI/D.

The Why and How of SDB in SCI

The type of spinal cord injury affects the prevalence of SDB; patients with quadriplegia are more likely to have SDB than patients with paraplegia.

New approach could jumpstart breathing after spinal cord injury

Published: October 11, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A research team at the Krembil Research Institute in Toronto has developed an innovative strategy that could help to restore breathing following traumatic spinal cord injury.

The team, led by principal investigator Dr. Michael Fehlings – a neurosurgeon/neuroscientist, specialist in spinal cord injury and senior scientist at UHN – published its findings today in the journal Nature in a paper titled “Cervical excitatory neurons sustain breathing after spinal cord injury.”

New Neural Network Can Restore Diaphragm Function after Spinal Cord Injury

Published: October 17, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Bottom Line: A team of neuroscientists has uncovered a neural network that can restore diaphragm function after spinal cord injury. The network allows the diaphragm to contract without input from the brain, which could help paralyzed spinal cord injury patients breathe without a respirator.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cell Reports

Author: Jared Cregg, Neurosciences graduate student at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio is first author on the study.

Exercise Improves Fitness and Strength for Adults with Spinal Cord Injury

Published: August 3, 2017

Exercise is particularly beneficial for adults with chronic spinal cord injuries, says a review published by NeurologyNow.

Does Exercise Help?

People with spinal cord injuries are far less active compared to people in the general population and even compared to people with other disabilities.

That’s why researchers in the United Kingdom and Canada decided to review the available evidence to see how much and what types of exercise are beneficial for people with these types of injuries.

Long-term change in respiratory function following spinal cord injury

Published: January 12, 2016

Study design: Retrospective study.

Objectives: To model the effect of time since injury on longitudinal respiratory function measures in spinal cord injured-individuals and to investigate the effect of patient characteristics.

Setting: A total of 173 people who sustained a spinal cord injury between 1966 and April 2013 and who had previously participated in research or who underwent clinically indicated outpatient respiratory function tests at the Austin Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, were included in the study. At least two measurements over time were available for analysis in 59 patients.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!