Sunday, September 27, 2020

Tag: Sexuality and Reproductive Health

Pregnancy In Women With Spinal Cord Injuries: What To Know

Published: September 12, 2020

It is important to find a physician who understands your unique situation. Many women with SCI report this being the hardest part.

Planning to have children is an important decision that most women will make at some point in their lives. The decision is not always easy and it becomes increasingly difficult for a woman living with a disability. Fortunately, with increased awareness and support, all women can have the family they desire. Women living with spinal cord injuries (SCI) may have some unique challenges, but that does not mean that they cannot become pregnant and deliver naturally.

Fertility following spinal cord injury

Published: September 3, 2020

Information for health professionals

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological condition that can impact on every aspect of the injured person’s life, including their reproductive health and fertility.

SCI causes significant disruption to male fertility and reproductive health. Although female fertility is generally not as affected, women with SCI may still face challenges during pregnancy related to self-care and daily functioning, as well as labour and delivery.

Electrical stimulation technique helps patients with spinal cord injury

Published: February 19, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

For many individuals with spinal cord injury, restoring autonomic functions – such as blood pressure control, bowel, bladder and sexual function – is of a higher priority than walking again.

Paralysis (loss of muscle function) is the most visible consequence of a spinal cord injury. Historically, there have been few significant advances in the treatment of such paralysis in individuals with long-term injuries.

Male Fertility After a Spinal Cord Injury

Published: February 3, 2017

Spinal Cord Injury Fertility Management – The Men’s Clinic at UCLA

Spinal Cord Injury Fertility

A spinal cord injury is a devastating event in a man’s life. Many spinal cord injured men are told that they are infertile because of their injury. This is usually not true. Men are often unable to ejaculate after spinal cord injury but their sperm production is usually normal. The physicians at The Men’s Clinic at UCLA can determine the best way to retrieve sperm from a spinal cord injured man and use the sperm for intra-uterine insemination (IUI) or invitro fertilization (IVF).

Quadriplegic woman to give birth to baby boy

Published: June 3, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

quadriplegic Jen Goodwin pregnantBENTON (KATV) – Finishing your second year of law school while single and pregnant certainly can’t be easy. Add on the fact you’re a quadriplegic confined to a wheelchair and it may seem impossible – but that’s exactly what Jen Goodwin is doing.

Seven years ago, Jen Goodwin was in a boat on Lake Hamilton when an accident on board resulted in C5 & C6 spinal cord injury, leaving her paralyzed from the neck down.

Can you still enjoy sex if you’re severely disabled? This bride-to-be, who has no...

Published: March 9, 2013

P1070365.jpg Sophie Morgan collectsSophie Morgan was left paralysed after a car accident in 2003, aged 18; Has no sensation from the waist down but has no complaints about sex; Sophie thought she’d live in celibacy, and discovered quite the opposite.

When I was invited to write about my sex life, I was hesitant. How much did I want to reveal about something so deeply personal?

I’m no exhibitionist – I do not relish the thought of strangers knowing intimate details of my life. But then I decided, yes, I would do it. Why? Because I realised my reticence was partly due to the fact that the subject of sex for people like me is still taboo. And it shouldn’t be that way.

Female Fertility after Spinal Cord Injury

Published: March 2, 2011

Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP Nurse Practitioner, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab (Formally the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)

Sexuality of the disabled often overlooked

Published: February 11, 2011

While few caregivers would think twice about assisting a person with disabilities in the bathroom, many feel squeamish about advising or assisting that same person in the bedroom.

The sexuality of people with disabilities, many of whom require varying degrees of assistance to lead fulfilling sex lives, continues to be overlooked, avoided or even dismissed as a component of holistic care because of a longstanding stigma that shrouds disability and sex. A dearth of resources, training and infrastructure to guide caregivers and patients in addressing sexual needs contributes to the problem.