Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: Spasticity

Urinary bacteria in spinal cord injury cases may tip balance toward UTIs

Published: January 17, 2019

The fallout from spinal cord injury doesn’t end with loss of mobility: Patients can have a range of other issues resulting from this complex problem, including loss of bladder control that can lead to urine retention. One of the most serious implications is urinary tract infections (UTIs), the most common cause of repeat hospitalization in people with spinal cord injuries, explains Hans G. Pohl, M.D., associate chief in the division of Urology at Children’s National Health System.

Diagnosing UTIs in people with spinal cord injuries is trickier than in people who are otherwise healthy, Dr. Pohl explains. Patients with spinal cord injuries nearly universally have bacteria present in their urine regardless of whether they have a UTI.

Patients with paralysis learn how to scuba dive at the Kennedy Krieger Institute

Published: August 12, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury:

As her father guided her wheelchair down the ramp alongside the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s pool on Saturday, 12-year-old Tylena Fisher fiddled with the folds of the borrowed wet suit she was wearing, and took a few deep breaths.

This is a girl who loves the feel of water sluicing around her limbs, who until recently was working on her underwater swimming, who takes every opportunity to spend time in the water.

About Spinal Cord Injury

Published: July 13, 2017

Anna Hopson’s PowerPoint presentation and interactive online lesson about spinal cord injury. Anna covers everything related to spinal cord injuries in this 35 minute Microsoft Office Mix Presentation.

Spasticity and Spinal Cord Injury: 3 Common Triggers

Published: May 13, 2016

Bladder, Bowel and Skin issues – If there is a sudden change in spasticity over a short period of time, it really makes you think about why the spasticity is getting worse.

Spasticity : two potential therapeutic avenues

Published: March 17, 2016

neurone_webFollowing spinal cord injury, most patients experience an exaggeration of muscle tone called spasticity, which frequently leads to physical disability.

A team at the Institut de Neurosciences de la Timone (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université) has just identified one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. It has also proposed two therapeutic solutions that have proved conclusive in animals, one of which will be tested during phase II clinical trials as early as this year. This work, published in Nature Medicineon 14 March 2016, thus opens new therapeutic avenues to reduce this physical disability.

Twelve million people throughout the world suffer from a motor disorder called spasticity.

Serotonin Causes Spasms in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: November 9, 2014

3d illustration of human spine. Isolated. Contains clipping pathUncontrolled serotonin contributes to spasms in spinal cord injury patients, according to a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark studied the enzyme L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) in animal models with spinal cord injury and Parkinson’s disease. The enzyme, the researchers believe, contribute to the manufacture of serotonin. The serotonin activates muscle control, and when there is too much serotonin pumped into the system, the motor controls are sent scrambling.

Secondary Conditions of Spinal Cord Injury

Published: September 9, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Tuesday Talk With AlexWhen living with a spinal cord injury (SCI), there are more challenges than just not being able to walk. There are other healthcare issues that are very important.

Here are a few of the secondary conditions mentioned by the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation.

Spinal Cord Injuries Create Long Term Health Issues

Published: July 24, 2010

Major accidents usually result in severe injuries sustained by one or more persons. Among these injuries, however, injuries to the spine is the worst to be suffered by those involved in the accident. Usually, this type of injury results to paraplegia, which is the inability to move the lower portion of the body, or quadriplegia, which is the total loss of movement in all parts of the body. While it is true there are some victims of spinal cord injury that seemed to recover after a year of rehabilitation, they are still susceptible to long-term health issues which may beleaguer them without end.

News on the underlying mechanisms of spasticity

Published: March 11, 2010

A recent paper in the journal Nature Medicine sheds some important new light on the underlying mechanisms of spasticity that often develops after a spinal cord injury. Involuntary contractions of muscles, or spasticity, can have potentially serious consequences, and although medications are available that reduce spasticity, they can also interfere with positive motor functions or rehabilitation.

Although spasticity represents an involuntary movement of muscle, the muscular activity originates with excited neurons telling the muscles to constantly move and contract (hyperexcitability).

BOTOX(R) (OnabotulinumtoxinA) Receives FDA Approval for Treatment of Upper Limb Spasticity in Adults

Published: March 9, 2010

IRVINE, Calif., Mar 09, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) — Allergan, Inc. (NYSE: AGN) today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved BOTOX(R) (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the treatment of increased muscle stiffness in the elbow, wrist and fingers in adults with upper limb spasticity.

Spasticity is a debilitating condition impacting approximately 1 million Americans1, many of whom suffer from spasticity in the upper limbs following a stroke. Upper limb spasticity may also occur following a spinal cord or traumatic brain injury or in patients affected by multiple sclerosis or adults with a history of cerebral palsy.

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