Saturday, October 19, 2019

Monthly Archives: March 2018

Sit Ski Trainer helps people with spinal cord injuries

Published: March 30, 2018

An inventor on the western slope is trying to help everyone ski, particularly people with spinal cord injuries.

HAYDEN — At his workshop near the town of Hayden, Wes Dearborn has an inspiring view that has helped inspire an invention to help people with disabilities learn to ski.

“Get people out skiing again,” said Dearborn.

He has spent the last 7 years working on something he calls the “Sit Ski Trainer.”

A 3-D spinal cord atlas will improve treatment of difficult injuries

Published: March 23, 2018

American football has a proud place in professional and collegiate sports, not to mention in hometown culture. Lately, the focus in football has been on concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease linked to damage caused by repetitive hits to the head. Spinal cord injuries are also a serious problem, as one of us (R.L.) learned the hard way with an injury that ended his career with the Seattle Seahawks.

That’s why we have teamed up to help create a comprehensive three-dimensional atlas of the human spinal cord, a missing piece of the puzzle that will help improve the understanding and treatment of these difficult injuries. Football, of course, isn’t the only cause of spinal cord injuries.

Spinal Cord Injury Research Evidence (SCIRE) Community

Published: March 20, 2018
scireproject.org

Spinal Cord Injury Research Evidence (SCIRE) Community provides free information about spinal cord injury research that is written in everyday language.

SCIRE Community is a new addition to the SCIRE Project. The SCIRE Project is an international collaboration of scientists and health professionals that provides systematic reviews of spinal cord injury research for health professionals and researchers. The aim of the SCIRE Project has been to enable SCI professionals to guide their practice based on current best evidence.

Paraplegic rats walk again after therapy, now we know why

Published: March 19, 2018

With the help of robot-assisted rehabilitation and electrochemical spinal cord stimulation, rats with clinically relevant spinal cord injuries regained control of their otherwise paralyzed limbs. But how do brain commands for walking, swimming and stair-climbing bypass the injury and still reach the spinal cord to execute these complex tasks? EPFL scientists have observed for the first time that the brain reroutes task-specific motor commands through alternative pathways originating in the brainstem and projecting to the spinal cord. The therapy triggers the growth of new connections from the motor cortex into the brainstem and from the brainstem into the spinal cord, thus reconnecting the brain with the spinal cord below the injury. The results are published in Nature Neuroscience March 19th.

‘Horseracing accident left me paralysed, but wheelchair basketball’s changed my life…’

Published: March 15, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

TEN years after a devastating horse racing injury left a him paralysed from the chest down, former jockey Wayne Burton revealed how discovering wheelchair basketball has transformed his life.

Mr Burton was just 24 when he was involved in a horse jumping accident at Exeter racecourse in 2008.

Having left Pewsey Vale School in 1999 to begin a career in the horse racing industry, Mr Burton was left reeling when he was told that he would never walk again.

Multi-site Study Explores New Approach to Upper Limb Dysfunction After Spinal Cord Injury

Published: March 15, 2018

A five-year grant from National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research funds multi-site study of intermittent hypoxia in spinal cord injury

East Hanover, NJ – Kessler Foundation has been awarded an $857,600 sub-award from the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), to study a promising new intervention for upper limb dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI).

Brain-controlled robot helps people learn to walk again

Published: March 9, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A new robotic treatment device helping people with spinal cord injuries learn to walk again can only be found in one place in the United States; Brooks Rehabilitation in Jacksonville.

Andy’s loving life in the fast lane

Published: March 8, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Houghton doesn’t let life-changing injury stop him racing

THE word determination is used a lot in sport – and for Andy Houghton it’s one of many words that could be used to best describe him and his sporting career.

Many people grow up dreaming of achieving success in sport and for Houghton it was no different.

Riding motorbikes has always been a huge passion of his and the determination and ambition that he has shown is one of the reasons why he has got where he is now.

Early microstructural changes can help predict long-term recovery from spinal cord injury

Published: March 8, 2018

Recovery from Spinal Cord InjuryA trauma to the spinal cord, quickly leads to a progressive loss of nerve tissue. This not only affects the injured area, but over time affects also other parts of the spinal cord and even the brain. These neurodegenerative changes can be explored in detail using magnetic resonance imaging. An international team of researchers headed up by Patrick Freund from the Spinal Cord Injury Center of the University of Zurich and the Balgrist University Hospital has now for the first time investigated the extent and progression of microstructural changes over the first two years after a spinal cord injury.

Study shows bowel care is top concern for those with spinal cord injury

Published: March 8, 2018

Cardiovascular physiology researcher Victoria Claydon’s latest study, published in the Journal of Neurotrauma, focuses on the results of her multi-national study, which surveyed almost 300 participants with spinal cord injuries at or above the mid-thoracic level (middle of the chest ).

As a first step towards improving quality of life for this community, Claydon first had to collect data on the most pressing concerns for individuals with spinal cord injury. Her results showed that bowel care, followed by sexual function, bladder function and pain were of key concern. Surprisingly, one of the lowest-ranked concerns was using a wheelchair for mobility.

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