Saturday, October 19, 2019

Monthly Archives: June 2018

New Health Videos Featured on the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation YouTube Channel

Published: June 27, 2018

Christopher & Dana Reeve FoundationSHORT HILLS, N.J., June 27, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for people living with paralysis, has created four new videos that feature informative information on different aspects of health and real-life situations while living with paralysis. The videos can be found on the Foundation’s YouTube channel, which also features personal stories, wheelchair reviews, new technology available, and many more.

The newest videos include:

Inflammation discovery opens window to better rehabilitation possibilities

Published: June 26, 2018

Findings could have significant impact on how spinal cord injuries are treated in the future

Inflammation plays a key role in improving the ability to relearn motor skills lost as a result of spinal cord injuries, such as grasping objects, new University of Alberta research shows.

U of A spinal cord researchers Karim Fouad, a Canada Research Chair in the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, and Abel Torres Espín studied inflammation and rehabilitation training in rodents and discovered that creating a mild inflammatory response improved a rat’s ability to relearn how to pick up pellets months following a spinal cord injury.

Quadriplegic photographer Loren Worthington captures adaptive sports

Published: June 20, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

At 21 years old, Loren Worthington slid head first into third base, but when he collided with the pitcher’s knee, he was instantly paralyzed. However, two decades after the accident that broke his neck, he discovered that by picking up a camera, he could still feel like he was right in the middle of the action.

Claire Lomas TT challenge: ‘I can only feel the handle bars’

Published: June 20, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

The idea of racing around the Isle of Man’s world-famous TT course is terrifying for most us.

Yet Claire Lomas, who is paralysed from the chest down, hopes to do just that while only using her hands to control her motorbike.

“The bike has hand-controlled gears, Velcro on my knees to stop them flapping, and toe clips to stop my feet sliding,” she said.

“I’ll have someone to launch me and some poor person has to trust me as I ride towards them for them to catch me!”

Gene therapy restores hand function after spinal cord injury in rats

Published: June 14, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Researchers at King’s College London and the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have shown that rats with spinal cord injuries can re-learn skilled hand movements after being treated with a gene therapy.

A Spinal Cord Injury Can’t Stand In The Way Of A Great Mom

Published: June 11, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

When Debbie Soliz first got injured, she was told motherhood might never happen for her. Now, she dedicates her life to showing other women with spinal cord injuries that anything is possible.

“He learned I couldn’t pick him up,” Debbie Soliz says. “So we fixed it so my son Allan could climb on a chair and climb on my table.” She points to the table attached to her wheelchair, which Allan broke at age 8. “And he would say, ‘mom, this is my place. And I’m not going to stop sitting here until it breaks’.”

Now 64, a social worker in Davis, California for the past 25 years, Debbie is an expert on being a mother with a spinal cord injury, or SCI.

Bladder Function After Spinal Cord Injury May Be Improved by New Drug

Published: June 6, 2018

Upon testing the drug in mice models of spinal cord injury over a one-month period, they found that bladder volume decreased to near-normal size.

An experimental drug referred to as LM11A-31 could improve bladder function in patients who have sustained a spinal cord injury, according to researchers from The Ohio State University. The drug blocks pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) and a receptor known as p75 which contribute to abnormalities in communication between neurons when nerves have been injured.

Researchers repair acute spinal cord injury in monkeys

Published: June 5, 2018

Spinal cord injuries are among the most severe and difficult-to-treat medical conditions, usually resulting in permanent disability including loss of muscle function, sensation and autonomic functions. Medical research is now on the cusp of treating severe spinal cord injuries by inducing the repair of spinal nerves, and scientists have made strides in recent years with rodents and primates.

Using chitosan loaded with neurotrophin-3 (NT3), a collaborative of Chinese medical researchers now reports the successful treatment and subsequent functional recovery of rhesus monkeys with induced acute spinal cord injuries.

Stem Cell-Based Phase I Trial to Repair Spinal Cord Injuries Produces Encouraging Results

Published: June 1, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , , , , , , , ,

First-in-human clinical study found improved motor and sensory function in three of four participants

Writing in the June 1 issue of Cell Stem Cell, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that a first-in-human phase I clinical trial in which neural stem cells were transplanted into participants with chronic spinal cord injuries produced measurable improvement in three of four subjects, with no serious adverse effects.

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