Saturday, August 15, 2020

T-12

Living ‘an Active Life with Inactive Feet’ After Spinal Cord Injury

Published: May 28, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Rosemarie RossettiA cautioning inspirational quote—Expect Nothing. Be ready for anything.—might be wise words to live by, but with a spinal cord injury, nothing like it is even on your radar screen, and it’s virtually impossible to be ready for it. In our exclusive interview with speaker, writer, publisher, and businesswoman Dr. Rosemarie Rossetti, she describes how she struggled to sustain an active life, well-lived before her spinal cord injury, after a freak accident dramatically altered her future on June 13, 1998.

Howell’s ‘unbreakable spirit’ is a winning recipe

Published: April 20, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Charlie Ray Howell’s unbreakable spirit winning recipeMT. PLEASANT — Charlie Ray Howell of Mt. Pleasant scored his first auto racing victory at North Alabama Speedway (Tuscumbia, Al.) since being confined to a wheelchair.

Howell, who’s win came on April 12 at the Tuscumbia, Ala. track, races to bring awareness to spinal cord injury and osteogenesis imperfecta.

Howell’s story is a little different than most Saturday night racers. Since 2010, he has been confined to using a wheelchair after sustaining a spinal cord injury in an automobile accident.

Howell’s spirit was unbroken, as he was determined to continue the sport he grew up doing which is racing his dirt late model on dirt tracks across the mid-south.

Neuralstem spinal cord injury stem cell trial approved to commence at University Of California

Published: April 18, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Neuralstem LogoNeuralstem, announced that the Institutional Review Board of the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine has approved the phase I safety trial to treat chronic spinal cord injury (cSCI) with its NSI-566 stem cells. The NSI-566/cSCI phase I trial will enroll patients with thoracic spinal cord injuries (T2-T12) who have an American Spinal Injury Association (AIS) A level of impairment, between one and two years after injury. AIS A impairment, which is complete paralysis, refers to a patient with no motor or sensory function in the relevant segments at and below the injury.

Bride-to-be perseveres to walk down aisle after spinal-cord injury

Published: August 22, 2013 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Alissa Boyle shows her wedding invitationJust like any other bride, Alissa Boyle finds herself immersed in

wedding plans leading up to her Sept. 7 exchange of vows with Nathan Grimes at Lisbon Trinity Friends Church.

And just like most brides, Boyle envisions walking down the aisle with her father, Jim, while her mother, Lori, and family and friends watch.

But Boyle’s preparation is unlike other brides. She spends hours in physical therapy and exercising at home to make that vision a reality. She was injured in an accident Feb. 20, 2012, that damaged her spinal cord. She and a friend had stopped to assist at a car accident but ended up being hurt themselves.

Restoring Function After Spinal Cord Injury With Nerve Transplant: The New Frontier

Published: September 22, 2011 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

As of yet, scientists and researchers have not been able to completely reverse the damage caused by spinal cord injury, but a core group of experts in this fast-moving field have been making advances with therapies that can return function and make life easier for SCI patients.

On Nov. 5, the Institute for Advanced Reconstruction at The Plastic Surgery Center in Shrewsbury, N.J., will be hosting a symposium for medical professionals to discuss advancement in treatment for SCI patients.

Project Mina Enables Upright Mobility for Those Who Have Lost the Ability to Walk

Published: April 5, 2011 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

IHMC Unveils the MINA Robotic Device

PENSACOLA, Fla., April 5, 2011 — Today, Dr. Kenneth Ford, Director and CEO of the Florida Institute for Human & Machine Cognition (IHMC), joined institute researchers to unveil Mina, a robotic exoskeleton developed to restore ambulation for individuals afflicted with paraplegia, hemiplegia, paresis, asthenia, and functional muscle loss. Developed by the IHMC robotics team led by Dr. Peter Neuhaus and Dr. Jerry Pratt, Mina acts as a pair of robotic legs that assist people, who have lost their ability to walk, in regaining upright mobility when outfitted with the device. Future applications of Mina are envisioned to span from rehabilitating those with stroke and spinal cord injuries, to augmenting human strength capabilities when operating in complex mobility environments.

Stem Cell Treatment for Spinal Cord Injury

Published: April 16, 2010 | Spinal Cord Injury:

[USPRwire, Fri Apr 16 2010] Stem Cell Treatment can be magical in saving incurable disease suffering patients. The Stem Cell Global Foundation, leading stem cell therapy provider has released results from a follow-up study of many spinal cord injury patients treated with autologous bone marrow stem cell -The Forbidden Therapy That Actually Works!

Jean’s Journey: Accident can’t stop trooper

Published: March 14, 2010 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

On her first vacation in 10 years, a severely injured Pennsylvania State Police trooper found herself being detained in Mexico by authorities investigating a fatal crash.

For 13 hours, Jean Altomari lay strapped to a spinal board in a primitive hospital some 1,500 miles from home. With her insurance card locked in a safe on a Carnival Legend cruise ship, treatment was minimal and an immediate transfer to a trauma center in Florida delayed. What little Spanish she knew wasn’t helping, and no one around her spoke much English.

Goal Driven

Published: August 12, 2007 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Despite challenges, Lindsay Heimkes still making strides118296

FILER – In 2006, Lindsay Heimkes joined the ranks of the more than 11,000 spinal cord injury cases that hospitals across the country see each year.

But don’t count this former high school and college athlete out of the game just yet. After hours of surgery and grueling therapy, she’s ready to get her life back on track.

When the call about her daughter came into the office, Tammy Heimkes remembers thinking the worst.

“I wouldn’t wish that feeling on anyone,” she said. “But knowing how Lindsay does everything big or go home, I knew if she was in a car accident it wouldn’t be something simple like a broken leg,”

RUSSIAN STEM-CELL THERAPY

Published: September 29, 2005 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , , , ,

We are a part of a global community in which the devastation of spinal cord injury (SCI) bows to no flag, and solutions will not be any country’s exclusive domain. Integrating the diverse pieces of the puzzle necessary to develop real-world solutions requires that we open-mindedly work in cooperation and not in competition. With such cooperation, restored function after SCI will be a coalescing reality and not just a never-ending, elusive pie-in-the-sky dream.

In this spirit of bridge-building, I recently traveled to Moscow, Russia where I became the first American scientist to check-out an innovative stem-cell program for SCI developed by the NeuroVita Clinic under the direction of Dr. Andrey Bryukhovetskiy. His work is especially important because few scientists have accumulated as much hands-on experience as he has in treating human SCI with stem cells, an approach many experts believe will play a key therapeutic role in the future.