Thursday, April 2, 2020

Tag: Quality Of Life

The tremendous spirit of tetraplegic Catriona Williams – who defies odds to fundraise for...

Published: February 23, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury:

This year Catriona will complete a month-long cycle tour in France.

It happened just before Christmas on the 10th of November 2002.

“You never forget your date,” she tells me.

It was the day Catriona Williams, one of our most accomplished horsewomen and leading contender for the Olympics, fell from her mount and broke her neck.

“I knew it was a bit more serious than a collarbone because the pain was so severe.”

Electrical stimulation technique helps patients with spinal cord injury

Published: February 19, 2019 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

For many individuals with spinal cord injury, restoring autonomic functions – such as blood pressure control, bowel, bladder and sexual function – is of a higher priority than walking again.

Paralysis (loss of muscle function) is the most visible consequence of a spinal cord injury. Historically, there have been few significant advances in the treatment of such paralysis in individuals with long-term injuries.

Out of tragedy, a man finds his true calling

Published: December 27, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Antonio Davis said his life was headed in the wrong direction when he was shot at close range and nearly killed 24 years ago. What he didn’t know was that his life was about to take an extraordinary turn with purpose. Though paralyzed from the chest down, he became an accomplished painter.

“I’m just creating. I’m just freeing my mind and what comes out is my true emotions,” Davis told CBS News correspondent DeMarco Morgan. “It’s a passion. It’s an obsession. I love it that much. And I hope it shows in the work.”

Paralyzed People Control the Robot Waiters at a Japanese Cafe

Published: December 12, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

In a win-win outcome for patients with spinal cord injuries and Japanese startup tech company Ory Lab, robotic waiters are working full shifts, allowing spinal cord injury sufferers to work by proxy.

Technological innovations, whether nano-sized or full-scale, have been offering a range of surprising capabilities that offer improvements in quality of life or life expectancy.

In fewer areas, the impact has been more dramatic than with people suffering from various spinal cord injuries.

New Health Booklets Featured on the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation Publication Page

Published: October 17, 2018

Christopher & Dana Reeve FoundationSHORT HILLS, N.J., Oct. 17, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for people living with paralysis, has created a series of booklets that features information about different aspects of health and real-life situations while living with paralysis. These booklets can be found on the Foundation’s Publications Page, which also features the Progress in Research newsletter series, annual reports, policy briefs, and many more topics to browse through.

An Italian Researcher Develops a low-cost Robotic Glove to “lend a hand” to People...

Published: October 9, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , ,

The majority of people who suffer the partial or total loss of the hand’s motor skills report a drastic reduction in the quality of life due to the consequent inability to carry out many activities of daily life. Performing tasks often taken for granted, such as buttoning a shirt, using the phone, or grasping utensils for cooking or eating becomes frustrating or almost impossible due to reduced grip strength and poor motor control of the hand that afflicts these people.

A research team from Harvard University and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, coordinated by Prof. Conor Walsh and led by Dr. Leonardo Cappello, has recently developed a wearable robotic system with the purpose of helping these people.

Inspiring, long-surviving disability advocate Walt Lawrence grateful for 50 years of support

Published: September 20, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

He’s been paralyzed from the neck down for 50 years and that makes Walt Lawrence either the longest surviving ventilator-dependent quadriplegic in B.C. or darn close to it.

“He’s outlived any statistical, predictive model. He’s off the charts,” says Karen Anzai, a spinal cord program educator G.F. Strong Rehabilitation Centre, as she looked at a graph on her computer showing expected lifespans of patients who are ventilator-dependent.

Neuroscientists restore significant bladder control to 5 men with spinal cord injuries

Published: August 22, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

In UCLA study, magnetic stimulation of lower spine eliminates need for catheter for up to 4 weeks

More than 80 percent of the 250,000 Americans living with a spinal cord injury lose the ability to urinate voluntarily after their injury. According to a 2012 study, the desire to regain bladder control outranks even their wish to walk again.

In a study of five men whose injuries occurred five to 13 years ago, UCLA neuroscientists stimulated the lower spinal cord through the skin with a magnetic device placed at the lumbar spine.

A Spinal Cord Injury Can’t Stand In The Way Of A Great Mom

Published: June 11, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

When Debbie Soliz first got injured, she was told motherhood might never happen for her. Now, she dedicates her life to showing other women with spinal cord injuries that anything is possible.

“He learned I couldn’t pick him up,” Debbie Soliz says. “So we fixed it so my son Allan could climb on a chair and climb on my table.” She points to the table attached to her wheelchair, which Allan broke at age 8. “And he would say, ‘mom, this is my place. And I’m not going to stop sitting here until it breaks’.”

Now 64, a social worker in Davis, California for the past 25 years, Debbie is an expert on being a mother with a spinal cord injury, or SCI.

Bladder Function After Spinal Cord Injury May Be Improved by New Drug

Published: June 6, 2018

Upon testing the drug in mice models of spinal cord injury over a one-month period, they found that bladder volume decreased to near-normal size.

An experimental drug referred to as LM11A-31 could improve bladder function in patients who have sustained a spinal cord injury, according to researchers from The Ohio State University. The drug blocks pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) and a receptor known as p75 which contribute to abnormalities in communication between neurons when nerves have been injured.

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