Sunday, December 15, 2019

Tag: Treatment Options

The Risk of Sleep Apnea for Quadriplegics

Published: May 11, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Not sleeping well? A new study shows more than 70 percent of people with quadriplegia also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

For many years, the N-ABLE team has heard stories about friends with quadriplegia who don’t sleep well at night or who only sleep a few hours a night. We wondered if there was a medical reason for this. As it turns out, there is.

A new study in The Journal of Physiology tries to show why more than 70 percent of people with quadriplegia also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a medical condition that causes the upper airway to narrow and close repeatedly while people are asleep.

A 3-D spinal cord atlas will improve treatment of difficult injuries

Published: March 23, 2018

American football has a proud place in professional and collegiate sports, not to mention in hometown culture. Lately, the focus in football has been on concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease linked to damage caused by repetitive hits to the head. Spinal cord injuries are also a serious problem, as one of us (R.L.) learned the hard way with an injury that ended his career with the Seattle Seahawks.

That’s why we have teamed up to help create a comprehensive three-dimensional atlas of the human spinal cord, a missing piece of the puzzle that will help improve the understanding and treatment of these difficult injuries. Football, of course, isn’t the only cause of spinal cord injuries.

Makeshift Syrian rehab center offers hope to paralyzed

Published: March 16, 2017

DOUMA, Syria, March 15 (Reuters) – Ziad, a paralyzed 14-year-old boy, often stays alone in his room as bombs fall on Douma, the main rebel-stronghold in eastern Ghouta on the outskirts of the Syrian capital Damascus.

Limited in scope, number and size, there are no nearby shelters equipped to receive Ziad who cannot be moved quickly or easily during airstrikes because of his spinal injuries.

“The shelters are not ready to accept people like me,” he said.

Until last year, treatment options were limited for spinal patients caught in a brutal civil war that has killed hundreds of thousands of people and displaced more than 11 million.

Using a Mini-Scaffold to Help Treat Spinal Cord Injury

Published: February 28, 2017

Patients suffering from complete spinal cord injuries have little to no treatment options that provide meaningful improvement in patient outcomes.

Cambridge, Mass.-based InVivo Therapeutics is trying to change that. Co-founded in 2005 by MIT professor Robert Langer, and surgeon-scientists Joseph Vacanti, M.D., the company has developed a small, bioresorbable and biocompatible device called the Neuro-Spinal Scaffold, to help patients with complete thoracic spinal cord injuries regain some function.

Help shape the future of SCI treatment

Published: April 20, 2016

Pathway-LogoThe path to recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) is full of challenges.

If you’re interested in taking part in research to evaluate investigational therapies for SCI, you may be interested in a clinical research study called Pathway that is evaluating the potential of neural stem cells to treat cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI).

What is the Pathway study?

The purpose of the Pathway Study is to evaluate the safety and potential benefit of neural stem cell transplantation for people with cSCI. If you are eligible for the study and if you choose to participate, your participation will last approximately 12 months.

Hope For Spinal Cord Regeneration

Published: February 11, 2015

shutterstock_188516501-771x514Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severely disabling condition that can result in full or partial paralysis, as well as sensory and autonomic dysfunction. SCI has an estimated incidence of 12,000 new cases per year in the United States alone, caused primarily by automobile accidents, falls, violence and sports. Despite extensive research, an effective cure is yet to be defined.

The spinal cord is the bridge between the brain and the rest of the body, conveying motor and sensory information between them. When injury to the spinal cord occurs, these pathways are interrupted, with motor control and sensory perception being impaired as a consequence.

Hope: Two paralyzed Georgia teens take different paths on stem cell treatment

Published: January 12, 2015

Hannah Locke paralyzed athleteStem cell therapy holds promise for people whose conditions leave them without much hope.

But it also poses a dilemma:

Stay and wait for U.S. stem cell experiments to pan out and receive government approval, or go abroad for treatments where breakthroughs have been touted but caution is being urged.

That dilemma has played out in Northwest Georgia with two teens whose accidents left them in wheelchairs.

Managing Chronic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

Published: August 18, 2014

Chronic (or long-standing) pain is a common problem for people living with spinal cord injury, and it is often very difficult to treat.

Spine Injury Information Many Doctors Don’t Explain

Published: February 6, 2012

Many doctors still don’t adequately explain the anatomy of the spine, the reasons for a patient’s pain and the anticipated treatment plan. Here we will discuss the intricacies of spinal injuries and how a skilled personal injury attorney can help.

FISHKILL, NY, February 06, 2012 /24-7PressRelease/ — How is a spine injury patient supposed to make an informed decision about his/her medical care if they don’t understand the basics about the spine? The problem isn’t as bad as it was a few decades ago, but many doctors still don’t adequately explain the anatomy of the spine, the reasons for a patient’s pain and the anticipated treatment plan when a patient goes to an orthopedist or neurosurgeon.

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