Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: Urinary Tract Infection

Urinary bacteria in spinal cord injury cases may tip balance toward UTIs

Published: January 17, 2019

The fallout from spinal cord injury doesn’t end with loss of mobility: Patients can have a range of other issues resulting from this complex problem, including loss of bladder control that can lead to urine retention. One of the most serious implications is urinary tract infections (UTIs), the most common cause of repeat hospitalization in people with spinal cord injuries, explains Hans G. Pohl, M.D., associate chief in the division of Urology at Children’s National Health System.

Diagnosing UTIs in people with spinal cord injuries is trickier than in people who are otherwise healthy, Dr. Pohl explains. Patients with spinal cord injuries nearly universally have bacteria present in their urine regardless of whether they have a UTI.

Learning to breathe, learning to move forward, learning to survive: The Billy Keenan story

Published: July 31, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Billy KeenanQuadriplegic turned inspirational speaker: “When you’re faced with adversity, you have two basic choices. Curse the darkness or light a candle.”

Billy Keenan said he had it all.

“At that moment in time, I was living my best life,” he said. “My wife and children were happy and healthy. At 46, I was in the best shape of my life. I was a competitive triathlete and surfer for the last decade.”

Doctor re-examines evidence on UTIs in patients with spinal cord injury

Published: December 13, 2017

People with spinal cord injuries rely on catheters to empty their bladder. When a well-respected publication concluded that catheters could be reused without an increased risk of infection, it didn’t sit right with a Vancouver clinician and researcher. He had spoken to wheelchair athletes about this very issue while working at the Summer Paralympics in London.

“Wheelchair athletes from wealthier countries would only use each catheter once while athletes from developing countries would clean and reuse their catheters again and again,” said Dr. Andrei Krassioukov, a professor of medicine at UBC and chair in rehabilitation research with ICORD. “The athletes who used catheters only once experienced three-to-four times fewer urinary tract infections than athletes who reused catheters.”

The award-winning device that tells you when you need to pee

Published: December 4, 2017

When you need to go, you need to go – unless you’re the type of person who has a hard time telling. Jihee Junn talks to the team behind wearable bladder sensor Uri-Go, winner of Callaghan Innovation’s C-Prize for 2017.

Five and a half years ago, Mike Brown broke his back, leaving him paralysed from the waist down. He could no longer walk, but he soon realised that was just one of his worries. “A spinal cord injury means you can’t typically feel anything below your injury. So in my case, I can’t feel how full my bladder is and I can’t empty my bladder naturally.”

What is Sepsis?

Published: October 3, 2017

Sepsis is a life threatening medical condition that arises when the body’s attempt to fight an infection results in the immune system damaging tissues and organs.

Washing Hands – How To | Quadriplegic (C5,C6,C7)

Published: July 6, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

Washing hands after experiencing a Spinal Cord Injury is an important role in preventing UTI’s (Urinary Tract Infections).

Grant Awarded to Spot Urinary Tract Infections among Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Published: November 16, 2016

suzanne-groah-md-msphWASHINGTON, D.C. (November 16, 2016) — Suzanne Groah, MD, MSPH, has been awarded a $500,000 grant by the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation to support screening for urinary tract infections (UTIs) among patients with spinal cord injuries at MedStar National Rehabilitation Network.

“Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection seen in the outpatient setting and the most common healthcare-associated infection, making it a major worldwide public health problem,” said Dr. Groah. In addition, spinal cord injury patients are at high risk for recurrent UTI, which is known to cause significant pain and discomfort; however, mobility limitations often create barriers to these patients receiving comprehensive care.

United Spinal Association Recruiting People with Spinal Cord Injury and Disease for a Study...

Published: March 17, 2016

United-Spinal-AssociationNEW YORK, March 17, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — United Spinal Association is working with MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital and Children’s National Medical Center to learn more about the experiences of people who use intermittent catheterization and who experience urinary symptoms frequently.

The research team at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital, located in Washington, DC (*participants can be located anywhere in the USA), noticed during a past study that people with bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury or disease (SCI/D) had much less Lactobacillus (a ‘healthy’ bacteria) in their urine, compared with those who didn’t have SCI/D.

What’s Next? In Limbo With Syrian Refugees Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: March 9, 2016

Mideast Jordan Syrian Refugees“Do you eat eye?” the man asked me, tearing meat away from a sheep’s skull.

“No, I do not eat eye,” I replied, pleased to have been given an out. “Thank you.”

I was the guest of honor at a small apartment on the outskirts of Amman, Jordan, where a group of about 15 Syrian refugee men all live together. Their uniting bond is their paralysis: All have spinal cord injuries from fighting in the Syrian civil war.

A few of the men had been my patients back in 2013, when I volunteered at a spinal cord injury apartment in Amman. At the time, their situation struck me as hopeless. I had good reason to feel that way — but I turned out to be wrong.

Autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury

Published: October 26, 2015

Autonomic dysreflexia often goes unrecognised in patients with spinal cord injury. Health professionals must be able to recognise when patients are at risk.

A young patient with tetraplegia arrives in the emergency department with a severe headache, dilated pupils, beads of sweat on their forehead, chest pain, bradycardia and a blood pressure of 280/130. What do you think is happening? Recreational drug use? A hypertensive crisis with a renal, endocrine or neurological cause? Is your immediate response to carry out an electrocardiogram and blood tests? In fact, this life-threatening emergency could be caused by something as simple as a full bladder.

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