Monday, December 9, 2019

Tag: walking

UofL research helps spinal cord injury patients take steps

Published: September 24, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , ,

Two research participants living with traumatic, motor complete spinal cord injury are able to walk over ground thanks to epidural stimulation paired with daily locomotor training. In addition, these and two other participants achieved independent standing and trunk stability when using the stimulation and maintaining their mental focus.

The research, conducted at the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center at the University of Louisville, was published online early and will appear in the Sept. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Spinal cord stimulation, physical therapy help paralyzed man stand, walk with assistance

Published: September 24, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Spinal cord stimulation and physical therapy have helped a man paralyzed since 2013 regain his ability to stand and walk with assistance. The results, achieved in a research collaboration between Mayo Clinic and UCLA, are reported in Nature Medicine.

With an implanted stimulator turned on, the man, Jered Chinnock, was able to step with a front-wheeled walker while trainers provided occasional assistance.

Paralyzed groom, 26, walks down the aisle with help of his new bride

Published: April 26, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Nearly eight years after Chris Norton was left paralyzed in a college football accident, he wed the woman of his dreams in a charming Southern ceremony where the pair were surrounded by tearful loved ones and friends.

Paraplegic rats walk again after therapy, now we know why

Published: March 19, 2018

With the help of robot-assisted rehabilitation and electrochemical spinal cord stimulation, rats with clinically relevant spinal cord injuries regained control of their otherwise paralyzed limbs. But how do brain commands for walking, swimming and stair-climbing bypass the injury and still reach the spinal cord to execute these complex tasks? EPFL scientists have observed for the first time that the brain reroutes task-specific motor commands through alternative pathways originating in the brainstem and projecting to the spinal cord. The therapy triggers the growth of new connections from the motor cortex into the brainstem and from the brainstem into the spinal cord, thus reconnecting the brain with the spinal cord below the injury. The results are published in Nature Neuroscience March 19th.

Brain-controlled robot helps people learn to walk again

Published: March 9, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury:

A new robotic treatment device helping people with spinal cord injuries learn to walk again can only be found in one place in the United States; Brooks Rehabilitation in Jacksonville.

Be Thankful and Heal Faster: Author Describes Spinal Cord Injury Recovery

Published: November 2, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Research projects at UCLA and elsewhere have proven that thankfulness (gratitude) has physical, in addition to emotional, effects on people. Shelly Kerchner, who just released her book Standing Tall: The Healing Power of Gratitude is an outstanding example.

Johnstown, PA (PRWEB)November 02, 2017 – Shelly fell and fractured some vertebrae in her neck. Totally paralyzed, she heard the doctors saying “What a pretty girl. What a shame she’ll never get out of bed again.” Unfortunately, this is the experience of most newly-injured people, many of whom, though helpless, are suicidal after hearing that prognosis.

Shelly was different. Going from depressed to determined, she told herself that paralysis was not going to keep her bedridden. She immediately gave thanks that she was still alive, and that she could hear and see.

Injured Olympian defies doctors to walk for his wedding

Published: July 9, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

On good days, American high jumper Jamie Nieto can shuffle 130 steps without a cane or walker.

It’s an important distance — about the length from the altar to the church door. His vow: Make it all the way, under his own power, when he’s married on July 22.

The two-time Olympian is recovering from a spinal cord injury he suffered on a misjudged backflip in April 2016. The accident initially left him with no feeling in his hands and feet. Walking? Doctors couldn’t predict if he would take more than a few steps — or any at all.

Shirley Ryan AbilityLab

Published: April 11, 2017
www.sralab.org

As the #1 referral choice for SCI patients from all over the world, we are renowned for innovative, interdisciplinary care. By integrating advances in research and technology, we continuously enhance medical and functional outcomes.

You want to recover what’s most important in your life — be it mobility, independence or walking again. Together we reach for those goals.

Doctors and nurses in our Spinal Cord Innovation Center provide specialized care. Our state-of-the-art Ability Labs infuse science into treatment. The goal: helping you get your life back.

One Small Step for a Paraplegic, One Big Step Toward Reversing Paralysis

Published: March 14, 2017

In a hospital in Switzerland, permanently paralyzed people are now learning to walk again with the help of stimulating electrodes implanted in their spines. For Grégoire Courtine, professor of neuroprosthetics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), this day has been a long time coming. “It took us 15 years to get from paralyzed rats to the first steps in humans,” he says. “Maybe in 10 more years, our technology will be ready for the clinic.”

Courtine has made it his mission to reverse paralysis. He started 15 years ago with those paralyzed rats, putting tiny electrical implants into their spines to stimulate nerve fibers below the site of their spinal cord injuries.

Man makes impressive recovery after near-fatal crash

Published: February 7, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Five years of pain can wear anyone down. Ask Josh Heine, and he’ll tell you healing often takes longer than expected.

After a near-fatal car crash in 2007, the 28-year-old Paducah native was left with only limited upper mobility. He had to adapt quickly to life as a quadriplegic, or so people told him.

Now after regaining limited use of his arms and legs, and with several wheelchair marathons under his belt, Heine has modeled for Quickie — a global wheelchair manufacturer — since last May. As a marketing student at West Kentucky Community and Technical College, he’ll begin a national ad campaign in April through wheelchair distributor Sunrise Medical.

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