Saturday, August 15, 2020

C-2

Former surfer, now quadriplegic’s advice: Never give up

Published: January 17, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

ronheagy_184ALBANY, Ore. — Ron Heagy Jr. of Millersburg, Ore., used to think he had problems.

He was 17, 6-foot-2, and could bench-press 300 pounds. He was going to be a fullback for Oregon State University. He had plans for spring break that didn’t include dragging his little brother along on a surfing trip.

But here he was, stuck with a 13-year-old, so mad he shrugged off his mother’s request for a hug goodbye.

March 17, 1980. A perfect, pristine morning, the day before his 18th birthday. Heagy left his brother snoozing on the sand and headed out for what looked like the perfect wave.

Aspen teen battles back from catastrophic accident

Published: December 28, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , ,

DENVER — Craig Hospital is known around the world for helping patients recover from spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries. They have treated more than 30,000 patients since 1956. We are honored to share some of their patients stories. Stories of Hope.

Laboratory Breakthrough Offers Promise for Spinal Cord Injury Patients to Breathe on Their Own...

Published: November 17, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Case Western Reserve University School of MedicineCase Western Reserve Researcher Presents Findings that Could Free Patients from Ventilators – Even Years after Injury

Case Western Reserve researchers have developed a procedure that restores function to muscles involved in the control of breathing – even when they have been paralyzed for more than a year. The breakthrough offers hope that one day patients with severe spinal cord injuries will be able to breathe again without the assistance of a ventilator.

iLove Stories of Independence

Published: August 18, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

An amazing insight on how technology is empowering independence.

Quadriplegic Perry Cross on why he travels to India as a ‘stem cell tourist’...

Published: July 16, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Perry Cross a C2 quadriplegicPERRY Cross was just 19 when he suffered a devastating neck injury that should have killed him.

Doctors told his family he had months to live, and if he survived beyond that the best he could hope for as a quadriplegic was just 10 years.

Now almost 20 years later, Mr Cross is still cheating death after a rugby accident that left him unable to walk, talk, eat, move his head or even breathe without the help of a respirator.

Quadriplegic savors what others take for granted

Published: June 10, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Quadriplegic savors what others take for grantedMaking the most of every moment

It will be 10 years this November since Justin Cochran attempted to entertain his family with a back handspring on a golf course and almost died.

The young man, who was only 21 at the time, fell directly on his head on that golf course in Kentucky just after Thanksgiving 2004. He was rushed to Vanderbilt University Medical Center where he spent 12 days on a ventilator. He was paralyzed from the chest down after crushing the C1 and C2 vertebrae and needed a ventilator to breathe.

InVivo Therapeutics Protects And Regenerates The Spinal Cord Resulting in Functional Improvement Below the...

Published: June 21, 2012 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Frank Reynolds, of InVivo Therapeutics (NVIV), says the company is on the verge of unprecedented technology for the treatment of the spinal cord. The Massachusetts-based medical device company is developing regenerative and neuroprotective technologies for the treatment of spinal cord injuries. It is the first company in history to successfully demonstrate functional improvement in a paralyzed non-human primate.

Below OneMedRadio interviews Reynolds where he speaks candidly about his own injury rendering him a paraplegic, and the passion behind his work. Reynolds will be presenting InVivo’s technology at OneMedForum New York on July 12, 2012.

The Site That Breathes

Published: January 15, 2011 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,
The Site That Breathes

“Life is not measured by the number breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.” This quote has two meanings for me. The first meaning is exactly how it’s stated. The second is a literal and personal meaning. Life is not measured by the number breaths I take, which happens to be 18 breaths a minute, but by the moment that took my breath away. On November 1, 2002 I was in a car accident. I broke my neck at C1 C2 and injured my spinal cord.

Los Angeles Man Working To Beat Comeback Odds After Spinal Cord Injury Leads To...

Published: April 14, 2007 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

According to the diagnostic scans, Leon Smith would never be able to reach out with his arms, grasp with his hands or take another step.

But the X-rays and MRIs were completed last August after Smith suffered a devastating injury to his spinal cord. Today, the Los Angeles resident is working toward resuming a normal life after two operations at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center gave him a chance to beat overwhelming odds.

“This is a one-in-a-million case,” said Justin D. Paquette, M.D., neurosurgeon at the Cedars-Sinai Institute for Spinal Disorders. “He was quadriplegic and Ventilator-dependent (unable to breathe on his own). A patient who is in this condition, with persistent spinal cord compression for even 24 hours, has essentially zero chance of recovery. Mr. Smith had been like this for almost a week before he came to Cedars-Sinai.”

Web gift widens local girl’s world Web

Published: March 19, 2006 | Spinal Cord Injury:

3originalUsually, Santa Claus arrives Dec. 25. This year, “Santa” took a little extra time to bring a special gift to a deserving young Edmond girl. Stephanie Mundell, 13, wished for a computer for Christmas, but she can’t type on a keyboard in the traditional way. When she was 3 years old, she was hit by a car and suffered a C-2 spinal cord injury, which left her without movement of her arms and legs and unable to breathe without a respirator.

Stephanie needed a computer she could operate with a mouthpiece, equipped with special word-recognition software. And with the help of some Edmond friends, “Santa” came through with a Hewlitt-Packard laptop computer, a printer and wireless Internet service.