Saturday, January 18, 2020

Tag: Canada

Wheelchair curling at the 2018 Winter Paralympics: All you need to know

Published: March 2, 2018 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Wheelchair curling made its Paralympic debut in Torino in 2006.

Teams are comprised of male and female athletes who have a physical impairment in the lower half of their body. This can include spinal-cord injuries, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and double-leg amputation.

The team has four players: Lead, second, third and skip, plus an alternate who can come in as a replacement.

Let’s Roll Out ALS

Published: November 24, 2017 | Spinal Cord Injury:
www.lets-roll.ca

Eddy Lefrançois built his site to share information regarding my diagnosis with ALS, and raise awareness about this terrible disease — please read about Eddy’s journey with ALS since the early 90s. He has surpassed his three to five year sentence as of April 1997. Eddy may not control the fact that he has ALS, but he controls the actions to make people aware that ALS is a terrible disease to live with… anybody can develop it at any time; we have to make it a treatable disease, not terminal. Eddy is proud to be a member of the ALS Canada Ambassador Program. «Let’s Roll Out ALS»

See his Bucket List being checked off, and look at other fun stuff he has managed to do, browse his site and enjoy… “I may have ALS, but ALS does not have me…”

App helps drivers in wheelchairs get help at the gas pump

Published: July 28, 2017

Langley’s Zosia Ettenberg says refuelling in wheelchair impossible without assistance

The simple act of filling a gas tank can be an insurmountable challenge for people who use a wheelchair.

That was the experience of Langley resident Zosia Ettenberg.

“It’s literally impossible for me to pump gas by myself,” Ettenberg told On the Coast host Tanya Fletcher.

“I have to park far enough away from the gas pump to get out, and then go around and have enough space for the wheelchair between the car and the pump,” Ettenberg said.

New discovery in spinal cord injuries shows oxygen can improve blood flow and restore...

Published: May 1, 2017

Neuroscientists at University of AlbertaA new discovery at the University of Alberta will fundamentally alter how we view spinal cord function and rehabilitation after spinal cord injuries (SCI). Neuroscientists found that spinal blood flow in rats was unexpectedly compromised long after a spinal cord injury (chronically ischemia), and that improving blood flow or simply inhaling more oxygen produces lasting improvements in cord oxygenation and motor functions, such as walking.

Previous work had shown that while blood flow was temporarily disrupted at the injury site, it resumed rapidly, and it was more or less assumed that the blood flow was normal below the injury. This turns out to be wrong.

Spinal cord injury patients may benefit from using exoskeleton earlier in treatment

Published: August 3, 2016

exoskeleton-studyCumming School study first in Canada to examine whether using robotic device immediately following injuries promotes recovery

Researchers from the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine are the first in Canada to examine the benefits of using an exoskeleton robotic device to rehabilitate patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) in the days and weeks following their injury.

First clinical guidelines in Canada for pain following spinal cord injury

Published: July 27, 2016

Lawson Health Research InstituteNew research provides recommendations to help manage neuropathic pain

LONDON, ONTATIO – Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute are the first in Canada to develop clinical practice guidelines for managing neuropathic pain with patients who have experienced a spinal cord injury (SCI).

Neuropathic pain is complex and chronic, and is the most common complication reported by people following SCI. The research team worked with care providers at Parkwood Institute, part of the St. Joseph’s Health Care London family, and an international panel to address the complex and unique challenges for managing pain during recovery and rehabilitation.

‘You can still live life’

Published: April 25, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Drew CumpsonIn a few days, Drew Cumpson will be marking the fifth anniversary of an event that dramatically changed his life — but one which he can’t remember.

If he needs to recall the exact date, he only need look at his left arm. Tattooed there is “05/10/11,” along with the words by which he has tried to live ever since: Keep Fighting, Keep Smiling, Stay Strong.

It is all a reminder of the trip Cumpson took to Peru back in May 2011 where a freak accident left him a quadriplegic.

TappCar’s accessible vehicles welcome in Edmonton, even for increased price, say advocates

Published: March 14, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Zachary WeeksRideshare accessibility comes into focus

Accessibility advocates say they’re cautiously optimistic new rideshare alternatives could make lives easier for people using wheelchairs but add they shouldn’t have to pay extra for the convenience.

Recently departed Uber had zero accessible vehicles, while the new city bylaw governing rideshare startups allows each company to choose between offering accessible vehicles or paying $20,000 into an accessibility fund.

Alberta men share inspiring stories of life-altering spinal cord injuries

Published: September 24, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Dr Ian Rigby life after spinal cord injury

CALGARY – Two survivors of devastating spinal cord injuries shared their stories with Global News, describing their paralysis and the very different ways their lives have changed since losing their ability to walk.

A look inside Carissa Louise’s life after attaining a C6/C7 complete spinal cord injury

Published: August 15, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Carissa Louise from Alberta Canada shows YouTube viewers that even though she’s living life as a quadriplegic, she is still living life.

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