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Monthly Archives: October 2013

Halloween Costumes for Wheelchair Users

Published: October 31, 2013

wheelchair-halloween-costume-batmobileIf you’re a person who uses a wheelchair, it can be a challenge trying to decide what costume to wear for an upcoming Halloween party. But, if you spend some time online, you’ll find plenty of Halloween costumes that you can make yourself without spending a lot of money. Whether the costume is for an adult or a child in a wheelchair, there are a lot of creative suggestions to be considered. Here are some ideas for costumes that involve a wheelchair. In addition, here are several websites with costume suggestions including the materials needed and the steps to follow to successfully create a look that will make you the talk of the party.

From Hope to How Soon? Paralympian and Gold Medalist, Victoria Arlen Sets Her Sights...

Published: October 31, 2013 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Victoria ArlenParalympian swimmer, Victoria Arlen defies odds and comes back from a vegetative state to win gold at the 2012 London Paralympic Games. With the same determination competing in the pool, Arlen now focuses her energy at taking steps at the Project Walk Spinal Cord Injury Center in Carlsbad, CA.

It’s a parent’s worst nightmare when their child becomes severely ill and doctors don’t know how to treat it. For the Arlen family, that nightmare became reality when their then 11-year-old daughter complained of side pains which quickly turned to full paralysis and stumped doctors as to the cause of her complete vegetative state. It wasn’t until three years later that the Arlen family was told by doctors that their daughter had contracted Transverse Myelitis, a rare neurological disorder that left her dependent on a feeding tube and blinking once for “yes” and twice for “no.”

Drug may reduce chronic pain for spinal cord injuries

Published: October 29, 2013

West Lafayette, Indiana – Researchers have discovered that a known neurotoxin may cause chronic pain in people who suffer from paralysis, and a drug that has been shown to remove the toxin might be used to treat the pain.

The toxin, called acrolein, is produced in the body after nerve cells are injured, triggering a cascade of biochemical events thought to worsen the injury’s severity.

Rehab centers adopt motion-based treatments for spinal-cord patients

Published: October 28, 2013

A women uses an exoskeleton suit to help her walk again.Locomotor therapies re-create and repeat the pattern of walking to train the spinal cord in functions formerly controlled by the brain.

Locomotor therapies re-create and repeat the pattern of walking to train the spinal cord in functions formerly controlled from the brain. More than 600 patients have trained in the system, with a wide spectrum of benefits.

It’s a declaration and a question, the first words on the lips of the newly injured after a spinal-cord accident.

“I will walk again.”

“Will I walk again?”

Does the Timing of Surgery to Treat Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Affect Outcomes?

Published: October 24, 2013

New Rochelle, NY — Performing surgery to take pressure off the spine after a traumatic injury soon after the event could prevent or reverse some of the secondary damage caused by swelling and decreased blood flow to the injured spine.

However, strong evidence to support early spinal surgery is lacking, mainly because the available study data cannot be easily compared, as explained in a review of this controversial field published in Journal of Neurotrauma, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

A pacemaker in the brain for spinal cord injury?

Published: October 24, 2013

2007 Regenerative MedicineDeep-brain stimulation, a technique used for more than a decade to manage the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, may help restore greater function and more natural movement to patients with spinal cord injuries that have left at least a few nerves intact, new research says.

A study published this week in the journal Science Translational Medicine showed that in rats whose spinal cords were partially severed, the implantation of a pacemaker in the brain’s mesencephalic locomotor region – a control center for the initiation of movement – restored the hind limbs’ ability to run and support weight to near-normal levels.

Dr. John Martin awarded $3.7M for movement control studies

Published: October 15, 2013

dr-john-martin$3.4M from NIH for brain development and injury research; $300K from Neilsen Foundation to study recovery of movement after brain or spinal injury

The laboratory of Dr. John Martin, medical professor in The City College of New York’s Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, recently received $3.7 million for three new investigations into how the nervous system controls movement. Two $1.7 million, five-year awards from the National Institutes of Health and a grant of $300,000 over two years from the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation comprise the funding.

Muffy Davis achieves goals despite injury

Published: October 11, 2013 | Spinal Cord Injury:

When Muffy Davis was a teenager, she used to ski against Picabo Street, the two rivals dreaming of someday competing for Olympic gold.

Davis had that dream taken away when she was just 16 years old. During a downhill training run, Davis veered off course and suffered a severe spinal cord injury that left her paralyzed from the middle of her chest down.

But Davis’s Olympic dream turned out to be more durable than she could have imagined. With enough determination, she was able to make it come true after all.

Ocean City family offering athletes with spinal cord injuries a place to swim

Published: October 10, 2013

place spinal cord injuries to swimOCEAN CITY — For some of the swimmers, like Angel Mullin, they hadn’t been in the water since before their injuries. But Bruckner Chase, his wife and his sister-in-law weren’t about to let that stop them. Their swimming program for athletes with spinal cord injuries has helped several athletes like Mullin feel comfortable not only in the pool, but in the open water, too.

“I kind of had my life in a wheelchair,” Mullin said. “You get limited.

“I try to do a lot of things in my life. When stuff is not accessible, you’re not able to enjoy those things. This is like exploring the world in ways that I never really did even before my accident.”

Knocking Out Spinal Cord Injury: Neuroscientist and Professional Boxer Team Up

Published: October 9, 2013

Boyd Melson and Wise YoungRutgers’ Wise Young and Army Capt. Boyd Melson fight to bring clinical trials to the United States

What would one of the world’s leading researchers in spinal cord injury and a professional boxer have in common? Under normal circumstances not much.

But Wise Young, a Rutgers neuroscience professor who is searching for a cure for spinal cord injury, and Boyd Melson, a West Point graduate and Army captain who is dedicating his life and boxing prize money to help make this dream happen, are two men on the same mission.

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