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After dire diagnosis, man with spinal cord injury tells his story through blog

Published: November 5, 2013 | Category: Videos | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Ryan AtkinsAs a junior at the University of Cincinnati, Ryan Atkins was “on top of the world”. He had a full ride scholarship, a good internship and everything that comes with college life.

“I thought at 21 years old, what could be better? And all of a sudden I’m driving with some fraternity brothers and lost control of the car,” explained Atkins.

The accident on Nov. 20, 2009 changed his life.

“Next thing I know, I broke my neck and I was in the hospital for about four months and paralyzed below the shoulders, and not really given much hope from doctors, and pretty much told that this would be my life.” Continue Reading »

Rutgers retires Eric LeGrand’s No. 52 jersey

Published: September 14, 2013 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Eric LeGrand saw his number retiredPISCATAWAY, N.J. (AP) — Moments after becoming the first player in the 144-year history of Rutgers football to have his jersey retired, Eric LeGrand told a loving crowd that his beliefs haven’t changed in the three years since he was paralyzed in a game against Army.

He will walk again.

In a passionate halftime plea to the crowd shortly after the No. 52 jersey was unveiled on the upper level box at High Point Solutions Stadium where the game is filmed, LeGrand asked them to support research to final a cure for paralysis, a cause he has joined by forming “Team LeGrand.” Continue Reading »

Surfer girl finds out how fragile life really is

Published: May 1, 2008 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

02_read_surfer-1Devyn Bisson, 15, suffers a spinal cord injury, gears up the courage to surf again.

HUNTINGTON BEACH She doesn’t remember the man’s name or much more about him. Just that he approached her and asked for donations as she worked at Becker Surfboards.

And how that changed everything.

On that summer day in 2007, Devyn Bisson was the kind of 15-year-old that we want all 15-year-olds to be – bright, athletic, enthusiastic, a bundle of bounce. She was intrigued by what this man was saying. Continue Reading »

Miracles Do Exist for Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: September 11, 2007 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Not so very long ago, injuring your spinal cord meant paralysis, perhaps death. The higher the injury, the worse the prognosis. For instance, if your spinal cord was injured in the neck or Cervical region, your chances of recovery were nil. However, injuries in the lower Lumbar had a much greater chance of partial recovery.

Today, however, medical miracles are around every corner, or so they were for the Buffalo Bills football star, Kevin Everett, who injured his cervical spinal cord a few days ago during a heads down tackle.

The initial assessment was grim, as they carried Kevin off the field. However, rapid and aggressive treatment may have saved him. The spinal cord was cooled with intravenous fluids, steroids were administered to decrease inflammation and swelling, and oxygen was given to the oxygen starved nerves within the spinal cord itself. Continue Reading »

Los Angeles Man Working To Beat Comeback Odds After Spinal Cord Injury Leads To Paralysis

Published: April 14, 2007 | Category: News | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

According to the diagnostic scans, Leon Smith would never be able to reach out with his arms, grasp with his hands or take another step.

But the X-rays and MRIs were completed last August after Smith suffered a devastating injury to his spinal cord. Today, the Los Angeles resident is working toward resuming a normal life after two operations at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center gave him a chance to beat overwhelming odds.

“This is a one-in-a-million case,” said Justin D. Paquette, M.D., neurosurgeon at the Cedars-Sinai Institute for Spinal Disorders. “He was quadriplegic and Ventilator-dependent (unable to breathe on his own). A patient who is in this condition, with persistent spinal cord compression for even 24 hours, has essentially zero chance of recovery. Mr. Smith had been like this for almost a week before he came to Cedars-Sinai.” Continue Reading »