Thursday, December 5, 2019

Tag: Australia

Golf: A game for everyone

Published: January 10, 2017

After becoming a quadriplegic in 2008, Sydneysider James Gribble’s is on an inspiring journey to make golf accessible for all abilities.

Everything changed in James Gribble’s life when an accident in 2008 left him with a broken neck. But one thing remained the same – he’s still a golfer.

Though it wasn’t easy for the quadriplegic.

For four years, he endured intensive rehabilitation, proving a series of doctors wrong to achieve significant recovery milestones – walking short distances on crutches and, most importantly, swinging a golf club.

World-first resort and health spa for people with spinal cord injuries Sargood On Collaroy...

Published: November 25, 2016

sargood-on-collaroyA WORLD-FIRST resort and health spa for people with spinal cord injuries is nearing completion on the northern beaches.

The $22 million Sargood On Collaroy has uninterrupted views of the beach and includes 17 specially built, self-contained apartments.

The resort will be partly owned by the State Government’s Icare, the Sargood Foundation and an unknown philanthropist.

Quadriplegic woman embraces future as mother after IVF treatment

Published: November 19, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

nicole-crawford-and-baby-1BABY Reagan stretches his hands as he lies on a pillow on his mother’s lap.

Nicole Crawford gently kisses his fingers, wondrous at the miracle that is his birth. She can only feel and touch him with her kisses.

She wishes she could hold her newborn baby in her arms, but as a quadriplegic she cannot.

Ever since she was a little girl, Ms Crawford dreamt of being a mum one day, but at age 18, a car accident robbed her of any chance of a ­normal life.

Soon-to-be doctor behind new spinal cord research six years after becoming quadriplegic

Published: November 5, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

dinesh-palipana-quadriplegicMOST doctors study for years so they can help others but for Southport’s Dinesh Palipana, it is much more ­personal.

A month out from his graduation ceremony at Griffith University, the 32-year-old doesn’t just want to help others, he also wants to help himself.

“I’ve had a vested interest and a passion to cure spinal cord injury and cure myself in the process,” he said.

Part-way through his medical degree in 2010, Mr Palipana was driving home to the Gold Coast from visiting his parents in Brisbane when his car aquaplaned on a wet road and overturned near the Gateway Bridge.

Cerebral Palsy And Being Quadriplegic Won’t Stop Christopher Hills

Published: September 28, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Christopher HillsThe Queensland boy runs his own video editing company.

Meet Christopher Hills, a young man from Queensland who thought his body would always limit him.

Having Cerebral Palsy and being bound to a wheelchair as a quadriplegic, Hills now says it’s only his imagination that’s the limit thanks to incredible technology that allows him to professionally edit video by tapping his head.

“I am a Toowoomba boy, but moved to the Sunshine Coast hinterland with my parents and younger sister about 10 years ago. I have Cerebral Palsy and am quadriplegic, but I feel like my disability has always taken a backseat to everything I do,”

‘I decided to have a recovery’: Rhiannon Tracey’s next big step

Published: May 3, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Rhiannon horse-riding since accidentRhiannon Tracey was two months shy of her 21st birthday when she found herself face down in a pool of water.

In Bali, on a girl’s trip with her mum and best friend, they had returned to the hotel pool after an afternoon of celebrating, when Rhiannon dived in.

She felt her whole body jolt as her head hit the shallows in the pool labelled ‘deep’.

Quadriplegic Jaimen Hudson’s soaring success

Published: April 2, 2016 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Jaimen Hudson and his girlfriendLeft a quadriplegic by an accident at the age of 17, Jaimen Hudson never said die. Instead, he found a way to soar – and the world took notice.

There’s a time before, and a time after. One’s not better than the other; they’re just different. These days, he doesn’t think much about the “before” time – before the day, at the age of 17, when he flew through the air on his Honda dirt bike for the last time.

There’s nothing he can do about the fact that before, he was 1.9 metres tall and could go free-riding with friends, scooting around sand dunes. Or, of a morning, wander outside in his boxer shorts to see what the surf was doing and, if it was good, nip back home to grab his board. Now, he has to wait until a carer arrives just to get out of bed.

Spinal cord injury patients in Australia call for national register to help track treatment,...

Published: March 20, 2016

wheelchair racer Jonathan TangSpinal cord injury experts in Australia have lobbied the Federal Government to establish a national register tracking the treatment and condition of patients.

Advocates believe more data could save the health system millions of dollars and improve the outcomes of people living with spinal cord injury (SCI).

Chris Bertinshaw from the Australiasian SCI Network said very little data was kept on people living with a spinal injury.

Quadriplegic Lee Bullock doesn’t let physical limitations stop his music-making passion

Published: February 24, 2016

Lee BullockLee Bullock cannot move most of his body, but he still does more with his time than many able-bodied people.

Mr Bullock became quadriplegic at the age of five after he was hit by a car.

He has been in a wheelchair for more than three decades, which he described as a “very long time to be sitting on your bum”.

But he does not let his wheelchair slow him down, spending his time writing songs and screenplays.

Bionic spinal cord offers new hope to the paralysed

Published: February 10, 2016

Bionic-spinal-cord-offers-new-hope-to-the-paralysed“Bionic spinal cord” could give extra function and mobility to users of mobility assist devices.

A ‘revolutionary’ device implanted in a brain blood vessel may one day enable people with spinal cord injuries to walk again, say Melbourne researchers.

The brain machine interface consists of a stent-based electrode (stentrode), which is implanted within a blood vessel next to the brain, and records the type of neural activity that has been shown in pre-clinical trials to move limbs through an exoskeleton or to control bionic limbs.

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