Monday, July 6, 2020

Tag: Miracle

Sion hospital opens stem cell centre

Published: September 30, 2008

MUMBAI: Ravindra Ahire, a farm labourer’s son from Malegaon, is happy he can hobble across the road with his walker. “I can manage half a kilometre,” he said with glee. Fifteen months ago when TOI met him at Sion Hospital’s neurosurgery ward, he was immobile after a bike accident.

Ahire owes his recovery from Paraplegia to stem cell therapy. “He can walk a bit, he has sensation in his legs and bladder,” said neurosurgeon Dr Alok Sharma and neuropathologist Dr Prerna Badhe who treated him.

"I'll Be Alright" trailer

Published: September 22, 2008

In the early morning hours of Dec. 24, 2004 track worker Armando Gonzales was struck by a security vehicle rendering him a C2 quadriplegic.

Miracle Michael will walk again

Published: August 16, 2008 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

wakemanDOCTORS feared Michael Wakeman would never walk again after he crashed a billy-cart into a car.

The 13-year-old had completely dislocated his spine, compressing a disc and squashing the nerves supplying the muscles to his legs, bladder, bowel and genitals.

Michael was riding the old cart down a road in Mount Colah in Sydney’s north six weeks ago when he hit a parked car and spun 180 degrees, slamming his back into the side of the car.

An ambulance helicopter transferred him to The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, where doctors found he was completely Paraplegic on his left side, and had just a flicker of movement on his right.

“When I looked at the scan I felt sick, it was so awful,” consultant neurosurgeon Brian Owler said.

Overseas treatment risky

Published: July 27, 2008

Stem cell procedures lack evidence

stemcelltourism1PHILADELPHIA — In February, Marcela DeVivo took her baby son to the Dominican Republic and paid $30,000 to have him injected with blood stem cells from aborted fetuses.

Nathan, who turns 2 next month, was born with the hemispheres of his brain fused. He is physically and mentally handicapped.

DeVivo is among a growing number of Americans spending up to $75,000 in the hope that clinics in developing countries have realized the dream of regenerative medicine: using stem cells to fix the so-far unfixable.

Wave Broke Modestan’s Neck, ‘Miracles’ Put Him Back on His Feet

Published: July 26, 2008

Jul. 27–The fog had burned off, the sand at Pismo Beach was beginning to sizzle and Modesto Realtor Fred Miller finally was hot enough to join his teenage daughters in the surf.

It was July 25, 2007, the second day in the family’s annual weeklong pilgrimage to Pismo, a trip they had been taking for nearly 20 years. Miller’s wife, Leanne, stayed on the beach while Miller and his brother-in-law, Phil Morino of Modesto, took their boogie boards into the ocean. Two of the Millers’ daughters, Natalie and Jacqueline, then 17 and 19, had been surfing for a few hours.

“The waves looked interesting in that they were larger and thicker than normal,” said Miller, who lived near the ocean for about half of his 61 years. “We had heard it was because of a storm down south.

Stem-cell tourism troubles experts

Published: July 12, 2008

In February, Marcela DeVivo took her baby son to the Dominican Republic and paid $30,000 to have him injected with blood stem cells from aborted fetuses.

Nathan, who turns 2 next month, was born with the hemispheres of his brain fused. He is physically and mentally handicapped.

DeVivo is among a growing number of Americans spending up to $75,000 in the hope that clinics in developing countries have realized the dream of regenerative medicine: using stem cells to fix the so-far unfixable.

Kevin Everett hosts fundraiser to help others with spinal cord injuries

Published: July 6, 2008

8627410_bg1-1HAMBURG, N.Y. (WIVB) – A devastating injury during the Buffalo Bills home opener, left many doctors thinking Kevin Everett would never walk again. But he’s back on his feet, and even hosting a fundraiser to help others with spinal cord injuries.

Kevin Everett is called a miracle man and the 12th man is on hand to meet at a tailgate party which leads up to Monday’s inaugural Kevin Everett Golf Classic at Brierwood Country Club.

Former Bills player Kevin Everett said, “It’s a blessing to be here, standing up here. I am blessed to be here.’

Everett is here and standing, a miracle of sorts considering his life was on the line following a devastating tackle during last season’s opening game at Ralph Wilson Stadium.

Kevin Everett recovers, reaches out

Published: June 20, 2008

311xinlinegallery2Mornings are the worst time for Kevin Everett. That’s when the pain is at its most intense, when he’s reminded that things probably will never be the way they once were.

“I’m still faced with challenges,” he said. “I pray every day that things will get better. I’ve got to cope with ’em the best way I can in everyday life.”

He knows he shouldn’t complain. Lord knows, it could have been so much worse. He thanks God every day that he can walk and talk and do the things thousands of others can’t. Therein lines the contradiction.

“I want people to know I’m blessed,” he said. “You’ve got to maintain your faith in the good times and the bad.”

One man’s quest to walk again

Published: May 4, 2008 | Spinal Cord Injury:

wishtowalk-tease300wEditor’s note: Paralysis after a spinal cord injury brings wrenching decisions: Do you accept it as permanent and adapt, or do you refuse to resign yourself? John and Marci Pou took the latter course after his accident, embarking on an arduous quest for Rehabilitation, recounted in a three-part serial narrative. Part I tells how the couple chose to gamble on a different kind of therapy. First of three parts.

It was only a chair, but it had become his purgatory.

Each day that John Pou spent in the wheelchair, his spirit seemed to die a little more. It was a perpetual reminder of the calamity that had brought him and Marci, even the kids, to this place.

New stem cell therapy for spinal injuries

Published: April 26, 2008

Namita’s life came to a standstill the day she suffered a spinal cord injury 16 years ago. Bound to a wheelchair all these years, she felt life was passing her by. Namita, who loved the outdoors, couldn’t even move without help. But what embarrassed her most was her loss of bowel and bladder control. Depressed, she had almost become a recluse. Then life changed suddenly again after she went for a new stem cell therapy. It worked wonders — she has regained some movement of her legs; she can take a few steps with the help of a walker and has even regained control over her bladder.

Harsha, a Bangalore-based Paraplegic, too has reason to smile these days. He had got used to life in a wheelchair for years. But a mesenchymal stem cell transplant in his spinal chord has given him some hope. Harsha can now move his limbs a little, and that’s given him a new lease of hope.