Thursday, September 23, 2021

Tag: neuroscience

Professor Alan Mackay-Sim

The future of stem cells: tackling hype versus hope

Controversy surrounds the link between Australian of the Year Alan Mackay Sim’s research and a Polish team who restored mobility for a paraplegic man. For...
paralyzed primates walk

If other paralyzed primates walk, will humans?

In the annals of breathtaking scientific advances, it's hard to top this recent news headline: "Paralyzed Monkeys Can Walk Again With Wireless Brain-Spine Connection." This...

Spinal cord rehabilitation and repair: an interview with Quentin Barraud

Spinal cord repair and rehabilitation is a difficult but important topic to research, can you please give a brief overview of research in this...

Brain implants allow paralysed monkeys to walk

Swiss researchers travel to China to conduct pioneering experiment. For more than a decade, neuroscientist Grégoire Courtine has been flying every few months from his...

UT Southwestern Researchers Amplify Regeneration of Spinal Nerve Cells

Newswise — DALLAS – Oct. 11, 2016 – UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers successfully boosted the regeneration of mature nerve cells in the spinal...

Human Neuron Transplants Treat Spinal Cord Injury in Mice

Chronic pain and loss of bladder control are among the most devastating consequences of spinal cord injury, rated by many patients as a higher...

Researchers find possible treatment for suppressed immunity from spine injuries

Scientists report in Nature Neuroscience they have identified an underlying cause of dangerous immune suppression in people with high level spinal cord injuries and...

Scientists pinpoint molecular signal that drives and enables spinal cord repair

Researchers from King's College London and the University of Oxford have identified a molecular signal, known as 'neuregulin-1', which drives and enables the spinal...

Spasticity : two potential therapeutic avenues

Following spinal cord injury, most patients experience an exaggeration of muscle tone called spasticity, which frequently leads to physical disability. A team at the Institut...

Discovery helps explain what guides neurons to connect

It's a wonder of nature - and a darned good thing - that amid many billions of similar cells in the brain and spinal cord, neurons can extend their tendrillous axons to exactly the right place to form connections. Otherwise we wouldn't move, sense or think properly, if at all. In a new study in the journal Science, researchers report a discovery that helps to explain how axons manage to find their way across the midline of the spinal cord.