Thursday, January 23, 2020

Tag: Wheelchair Athletes

Rio Paralympics: Kurt Fearnley predicts ‘boosting’ cheats will get caught

Published: November 19, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Kurt FearnleyAustralia’s champion wheelchair racer Kurt Fearnley says from his first Paralympics, in Sydney 2000, he has heard stories about boosting – the practice among athletes with spinal cord injuries of inflicting trauma on themselves, such as breaking a toe or sitting on their scrotums, to raise their blood pressure and improve performance.

The International Paralympic Committee has announced that in the lead-up to the Rio Paralympics it will crack down on the illegal practice, which involves tricking the brain into triggering autonomic dysreflexia, which causes the body to flush with adrenaline.

Five Years After Being Paralyzed from the Chest Down, Dustin Shillcox Completes the New...

Published: November 1, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Dustin ShillcoxAfter crossing the finish line in the New York City Marathon Sunday, hand cyclist Dustin Shillcox had a message for the millions of people living with paralysis. “I’m living proof nothing is impossible.”

The 31-year-old from Green River, Wyoming, is paralyzed from the chest down, but that didn’t stop him from racing in the marathon and crossing the finish line in one hour, 46 minutes and 49 seconds.

“It’s hard to put into words how I felt crossing the finish line,” Shillcox said. “I thought about Christopher Reeve, and the millions living with paralysis who are told there is no hope for recovery.”

Looking beyond the wheels

Published: October 14, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , ,

As Robert Thompkins climbed to the top of Green Valley Falls in September 2005, he had no idea that in a few short moments he would never walk again.

He made the decision to jump off a cliff into the water below, never knowing how incredibly shallow it was. As he hit the rocks beneath the surface, he severed his spinal cord from the T12 to the L3 vertebrae. He was 25.

Such an accident can either destroy a person’s ability to see the beauty in life or reinforce it. The now 33-year-old Thompkins chose the latter.

Always Climb Higher by Jeff Pagels

Published: August 16, 2015

Always-Climb-HigherStory of the comeback from a devastating spinal cord injury in 1984 to Jeff Pagels and how he came back to be the fastest USA Nordic Disabled Skier in the world and then abandoned competition against others to just compete with himself by climbing mountains and other extreme outdoor pursuits.

Jeff Pagels received his label, disabled, in 1984 when a tree fell on him. A wheelchair user since then, he has gone on to become the USA’s most decorated cross-country skier with 5 Paralympic medals. In 1995, Jeff turned to competing with himself rather than beating up on other people. His venue is all outdoors including many of the highest places in this world.

Communication, Sport and Disability: The Case of Power Soccer

Published: August 11, 2015

power-soccer-book-coverAbout: Sports are everywhere in American society, and given their prominence in the culture, it is easy to understand how most youth in the United States face pressure to participate in organized sports. But what does this mean for the hundreds of thousands of Americans who live with one or more physical disabilities and, in particular, those in powered wheelchairs?

Located at the intersection of sports and disability, this book tells the story of power soccer – the first competitive team sport specifically designed for power wheelchair users. Beginning in France in the 1970s, today, over sixty teams compete within the United States Power Soccer Association (USPSA) and the sport is actively played in over thirty countries.

Questions with Bob Sansevere Quadriplegic athlete Jennifer Peterson

Published: July 11, 2015

Jennifer Peterson

In 1983, at age 17, Jennifer Peterson was injured while downhill skiing. The injury left her a quadriplegic, with no use of her legs and limited use of her arms. While her body was different, her drive and determination to succeed was not. She got her Ph.D in Organizational Psychology from Walden University and became an executive coach. And stayed involved in sports.

As she wrote on her website, tailfeathercoach.com, “I have experienced first hand that life can throw curve balls and as a result, I’ve learned to adjust my swing.”

Essendon woman takes up Run Melbourne challenge in wheelchair

Published: July 8, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: , , , ,

Georgina Fiorentino GEORGINA Fiorentino thought her life was over when she lost feeling in her legs and became reliant on a wheelchair.

“You go through a whole process in your mind that it’s all too hard,” the Essendon North resident said.

“A lot of people have no idea the bits and pieces that follow on from a spinal injury.

“There are so many other things that are affected that are worse than not being able to walk.”

Quadriplegic bodybuilder works towards going pro

Published: May 30, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

WBTW-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Florence, SC

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (WBTW) – With the help of friends and family one local quadriplegic man is working towards becoming a professional body builder.

Wheelchair basketball tournament in Winston-Salem helps raise awareness

Published: March 8, 2015

Wheelchair basketball tournament in Winston-SalemMembers of the Winston-Salem Triad Trackers wheelchair basketball team raced up and down the court Sunday against the Augusta Bulldogs, wheelchairs knocking together as they vied for the ball and executed plays.

The Triad Trackers won that game to finish seventh in the Carolinas Wheelchair Basketball Conference tournament.

The team may not have won the championship, but it improved on last year’s finish and had the coveted role of tournament host, an opportunity players hoped would raise local awareness of the league.

Wheelchair tennis helps overcome injuries

Published: March 3, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

2014 US Open Wheelchair ChampionshipSouth Charlotte pair travels the country playing in tournaments

Nick Burnham and Larry Keeter have a lot in common.

They share a south Charlotte apartment, but they also are tennis partners who travel together to compete in tournaments across the country.

They play in a wheelchair league because they also both are incomplete paraplegics, having sustained injuries that left them with spinal-cord injuries that changed their lives.

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!