Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Monthly Archives: September 2015

Without An Exoskeleton, Paralyzed Man Uses Brain Control To Walk

Published: September 28, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

brain-controlled-walking-testA man who is at the center of a new project being conducted by researchers from the University of California Irvine is giving hope to people with spinal cord injuries who have lost their ability to move their limbs that they will be able to one day walk again. Paralyzed for five years, an unnamed 26-year old was able to walk on his own with only a harness to help support his weight.

What makes this achievement so groundbreaking is that he was able to move using his own brainwaves without an exoskeleton to hold up his frame. Instead, electrodes were attached directly to his muscles so that he could control them, bypassing his injured spinal cord.

Paraplegic recounts relearning to walk via brain-computer link

Published: September 26, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Paraplegic Adam FritzFirst person paralysed from waist down to walk without use of robotics

For paraplegic Adam Fritz, the thrill of the computer-assisted first steps he took five years after being paralysed in a motorcycle crash came only after he was unhooked from the system that enabled him to walk briefly in a bioengineering lab.

During the experiment itself, Fritz recounted, he had to keep his mind focused entirely on placing one foot in front of the other as his brain waves were translated by a computer algorithm into impulses that bypassed his severed spinal cord and activated his legs.

Ten remarkable breakthroughs in the treatment of paralysis

Published: September 25, 2015

First man to walk using brainpowerAfter a man completely paralysed from the waist down became the first paraplegic patient to walk without relying on manually operated robotic limbs, ITV News looks at ten remarkable breakthroughs in paralysis treatment.

1. Cell transplant helps paralysed man walk again

Last year, Bulgarian Darek Fidyka was thought to have become the first person in the world to recover from complete severing of the spinal nerves, after cells from his nose were used to provide pathways along which broken tissue was able to grow.

Alberta men share inspiring stories of life-altering spinal cord injuries

Published: September 24, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Dr Ian Rigby life after spinal cord injury

CALGARY – Two survivors of devastating spinal cord injuries shared their stories with Global News, describing their paralysis and the very different ways their lives have changed since losing their ability to walk.

Q&A: The Lesser-known Maladies of Spinal Cord Injuries

Published: September 24, 2015

shutterstock_96976301-300Last month, David Sharp and his fellow colleagues at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y., received a $1.2 million grant from New York State to advance their promising technology for treating paralysis and other effects of spinal cord injuries (SCI).

The grant is one of nine totaling $5.7 million announced by N.Y. Governor Andrew Cuomo. The funding will be administered by the New York State Spinal Cord Injury Research program, and represents the first round of competitive awards since funding was re-instated for the program in 2013.

Los Altos family backs The Big Idea

Published: September 23, 2015

Chris-and-Jennifer-BridgmanAbove all else, Chris and Jennifer Bridgman are heartened.

In the five years since Chris suffered a spinal cord injury resulting in paralysis, the Los Altos couple has pursued a cure for the injury doctors said would be permanent.

A current research project gives them hope that Chris’s diagnosis could change.

The Bridgmans are partnering with the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation to support The Big Idea – a clinical study of paralyzed patients that has already yielded groundbreaking results.

Using Transplanted Olfactory Mucosa Cells in Spinal Cord Injury Surgeries

Published: September 22, 2015

Olfactory Mucosa Cells in Spinal Cord InjuryPatients treated for spinal cord injury (SCI) using olfactory mucosa lamina propria (OLP) transplants demonstrated modest improvements, according to research published in Cell Transplantation.

A global team of researchers aimed to determine whether OLP transplants promote regeneration and functional recovery in chronic human SCI by randomizing 12 subjects to OLP transplants (8 patients) or control sham surgery (4 patients). The subjects were examined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electromyography (EMG), urodynamic study (UDS), American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS), and other functional assessments. The researchers commented that high levels of nerve growth factor and neurotrpohic receptor expression are typically demonstrated by autologous olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs).

The Connected Catheter by Spinal Singularity

Published: September 21, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: ,

Derek HerreraThe world’s first semi-permanent, minimally invasive, smart catheter system for Neurogenic Bladder.

After Derek Herrera was paralyzed by a sniper in Afghanistan, he decided to start a company to improve quality of life for people living with paralysis.

I knew my life would change, but I didn’t know that managing my bladder would be the most challenging task I faced on a daily basis. As a individual living each day with paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury, I understand just how terrible the current standard of care can be for managing Neurogenic Bladder.

Paraplegic Man Races On Mechanical Legs

Published: September 19, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

paraplegic-man-races-on-mechanical-legsDenny Ross – paralyzed from the chest down in a car accident – has gone from counting his steps to counting kilometres, attempting to finish a five kilometre race with the use of a ReWalk exoskeleton on Saturday.

“It’s a huge step,” he said with a laugh while taking part in the N.E.R.D. Run at William Hawrelak Park, an annual fundraiser supporting the University of Alberta’s Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute.

Ross has been using the exoskeleton as part of a pilot study examining the effects of using the ReWalk device, purchased by the Spinal Cord Injury Treatment Society in 2014 and leased to the university for the trial.

AbleThrive

Published: September 14, 2015
AbleThrive.com
AbleThrive.com

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