Friday, April 3, 2020

Tag: Employment

Colorado court rules fired medical marijuana patient can’t get job back

Published: June 15, 2015 | Spinal Cord Injury:

DENVER, CO - SEPTEMBER 30: Brandon Coats leaves the courthouse at the end of the hearing with his attorney Michael Evans, right. The Colorado Supreme Court listens to arguments in the the case of Brandon Coats, a quadriplegic medical marijuana patient who was fired from his job at Dish Network after testing positive for marijuana. A written decision by the court will be issued at a later date.  (Kathryn Scott Osler/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Brandon Coats is a quadriplegic who was fired by Dish Network after failing a drug test in 2010. The company said it has a zero-tolerance drug policy.

Cannabis consumption is cause to be fired in Colorado, the state’s supreme court has ruled, despite the drug’s legal status and the appeal of a quadriplegic man who was fired for using medical marijuana.

Quadriplegic teacher aide a great role model

Published: November 28, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury:

Dan Horton quadriplegic teacher aideA MAN who became a quadriplegic after a motorbike accident is working as a teacher aide at Yarwun Primary School, and is one of the best, according to staff.

Dan Horton took a break from studying yesterday to reflect on the accident that 10 years ago put him in a wheelchair.

“It’s not something to celebrate, but I definitely thought about it,” he said.

“It feels like it only happened a few months ago, but at the same time it feels so far away.”

Veterans with spinal cord injuries gain jobs, sense of purpose

Published: September 18, 2014

Troy Webb working after spinal cord injuryTAMPA — Troy Webb rolled his wheelchair back from a wall of screens showing the busy hallways of the James A. Haley VA Medical Center. He can see into a million square feet of the center through more than 100 cameras from his work space, a room the size of an average bedroom.

He picked up a ringing phone. A Mercedes was involved in an accident in the parking garage. It was turning out to be a quiet morning, but more than 10,000 people would filter through the center by the end of the day.

Paralysis leads to business success

Published: April 14, 2014 | Spinal Cord Injury: , ,

Paul Farthing Southeast MedicalOn July 27, 1993, 19-year-old Paul Farthing was playing with his Great Dane pup near his backyard pool.

“I had just shaved my head and was preparing to go back to The Citadel. I was selected for the Training Cadre,” said Farthing, now 39.

He was playfully taunting the pup to get her to chase him toward the pool, and then he’d jump in. The puppy wasn’t ready for water sports, so she didn’t follow. During one of his jumps, Farthing found himself at the shallow end of the pool.

Long Beach vocational assistance program helps veterans with spinal injuries find jobs

Published: March 10, 2014

Veteran Mike MetalLONG BEACH >> Knowing that college was not what he wanted to do in his 20s, Mike Metal joined the Navy and trained to fight pirates in the dangerous waters off the east coast of Africa.

Now, more than half a decade after medical problems forced him to leave the service, Metal is working on a second master’s degree and planning a career to help other veterans transition from military life to the civilian world.

The inspirational doctor paralyzed from the waist who can still perform surgeries thanks to...

Published: November 27, 2013

paralyzed doctor performs surgeryA successful Missouri surgeon has beaten unbelievable odds by returning to the OR after suffering sudden paralysis from the waist down.

Dr. Ted Rummel lost his ability to walk or stand when a blood-filled cyst on his spine burst in 2010. A year of intense rehabilitation later, he was back in the game.

Rummel even overcame the hindrance of sitting as he worked by utilizing an ingenious stand-up wheel chair.

Bangalore: They’re job ready. But workplace isn’t ready

Published: November 13, 2013

Bangalore-Theyre job ready-But workplace isntA wheelchair-bound man got a placement, but couldn’t take it up as the workplace wasn’t disabled-friendly.

Meet P Shivashankar Naidu, Anjanappa SN and Shivaraj MV. They wanted to become somebodies in society and support their parents and families but have been confined to wheelchairs. They lost their mobility and sensation in their spinal cords due to injuries, but they still live in the hope of becoming self-reliant.

Shivashankar Naidu passed his PUC, and was dreaming of becoming a police constable and even passed the physical test. He was set to attend the written exam, but his destiny had other ideas.

Retooling people with mobility problems for tech jobs

Published: June 14, 2013

Project ENABLEA yearlong workshop at the Magee Rehabilitation Hospital in Philadelphia is connecting people with mobility disabilities to a growing field in need of new professionals — computer science.

It’s called Project ENABLE and pays participants to train in computer programming and related topics.

Funding comes from the National Science Foundation.

This week students are learning to design their own smartphone apps. In past workshops, they programmed robots.

Christopher O’Rourke, 23, of Gibbsboro, N.J., suffered a spinal cord injury during a 2010 motorcycle accident. He now uses a wheelchair.

Decades after ADA became law, disabled people are still fighting for full inclusion

Published: July 24, 2011

During one especially cold morning in January of last year, a disabled man who uses a wheelchair and ventilator , and his wife were heading for their office in the 100 block of South 11th Street in downtown St. Louis. They were accosted that morning by a woman, standing outside the building, smoking a cigarette.

She wanted to know why in the world a man in a wheelchair would be out in this weather. She wasn’t placated by the obvious response from the man’s companion that he, like many other St.Louisans, was simply on his way to work. It apparently didn’t occur to the woman that some severely disabled people work every day.

Why spinal injuries are not what we see on TV

Published: April 25, 2011

Spinal injuries can certainly be serious, but they don’t always have to spell an end to life as we know it

THIRTY-ONE years ago Colm Whooley came off his motorbike and broke his back. He was paralysed from the chest down and spent nine months in hospital. Today he scuba dives, fly-fishes, teaches self-defence and kayaks.

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